Debates in the Digital Humanities 2023

2023

Matthew K. Gold and Lauren F. Klein, Editors

A cutting-edge view of the digital humanities at a time of global pandemic, catastrophe, and uncertainty

Debates in the Digital Humanities 2023 presents a state-of-the-field vision of digital humanities amid rising social, political, economic, and environmental crises; a global pandemic; and the deepening of austerity regimes in U.S. higher education. This fourth volume in the Debates in the Digital Humanities series provides a look not just at where DH stands but also where it is going.

Where do the digital humanities stand in 2023? Debates in the Digital Humanities 2023 presents a state-of-the-field vision of digital humanities amid rising social, political, economic, and environmental crises; a global pandemic; and the deepening of austerity regimes in U.S. higher education. Providing a look not just at where DH stands but also where it is going, this fourth volume in the Debates in the Digital Humanities series features both established scholars and emerging voices pushing the field’s boundaries, asking thorny questions, and providing space for practitioners to bring to the fore their research and their hopes for future directions in the field. Carrying forward the themes of political and social engagement present in the series throughout, it includes crucial contributions to the field—from a vital forum centered on the voices of Black women scholars, manifestos from feminist and Latinx perspectives on data and DH, and a consideration of Indigenous data and artificial intelligence, to essays that range across topics such as the relation of DH to critical race theory, capital, and accessibility.

Contributors: Harmony Bench, Ohio State U; Christina Boyles, Michigan State U; Megan R. Brett, George Mason U; Michelle Lee Brown, Washington State U; Patrick J. Burns, New York U; Kent K. Chang, U of California, Berkeley; Rico Devara Chapman, Clark Atlanta U; Marika Cifor, U of Washington; María Eugenia Cotera, U of Texas; T. L. Cowan, U of Toronto; Marlene L. Daut, U of Virginia; Quinn Dombrowski, Stanford U; Kate Elswit, U of London; Nishani Frazier, U of Kansas; Kim Gallon, Brown U; Patricia Garcia, U of Michigan; Lorena Gauthereau, U of Houston; Masoud Ghorbaninejad, University of Victoria; Abraham Gibson, U of Texas at San Antonio; Nathan P. Gibson, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich; Kaiama L. Glover, Barnard College; Hilary N. Green, Davidson College; Jo Guldi, Southern Methodist U; Matthew N. Hannah, Purdue U Libraries; Jeanelle Horcasitas, DigitalOcean; Christy Hyman, Mississippi State U; Arun Jacob, U of Toronto; Jessica Marie Johnson, Johns Hopkins U and Harvard U; Martha S. Jones, Johns Hopkins U; Annette K. Joseph-Gabriel, Duke U; Mills Kelly, George Mason U; Spencer D. C. Keralis, Digital Frontiers; Zoe LeBlanc, U of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Jason Edward Lewis, Concordia U; James Malazita, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Alison Martin, Dartmouth College; Linda García Merchant, U of Houston Libraries; Rafia Mirza, Southern Methodist U; Mame-Fatou Niang, Carnegie Mellon U; Jessica Marie Otis, George Mason U; Marisa Parham, U of Maryland; Andrew Boyles Petersen, Michigan State U Libraries; Emily Pugh, Getty Research Institute; Olivia Quintanilla, UC Santa Barbara; Jasmine Rault, U of Toronto Scarborough; Anastasia Salter, U of Central Florida; Maura Seale, U of Michigan; Celeste Tường Vy Sharpe, Normandale Community College; Astrid J. Smith, Stanford U Libraries; Maboula Soumahoro, U of Tours; Mel Stanfill, U of Central Florida; Tonia Sutherland, U of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Gabriela Baeza Ventura, U of Houston; Carolina Villarroel, U of Houston; Melanie Walsh, U of Washington; Hēmi Whaanga, U of Waikato; Bridget Whearty, Binghamton U; Jeri Wieringa, U of Alabama; David Joseph Wrisley, NYU Abu Dhabi.

Matthew K. Gold is associate professor of English and digital humanities at CUNY Graduate Center. He is the editor of Debates in the Digital Humanities and, with Lauren F. Klein, the coeditor Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016 and Debates in the Digital Humanities 2019 (all from Minnesota).

Lauren F. Klein is Winship Distinguished Research Professor and associate professor of English and quantitative theory and methods at Emory University. She is the author of An Archive of Taste: Race and Eating in the Early United States (Minnesota, 2020) and the coauthor of Data Feminism.

About This Book