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Debates in the Digital Humanities 2019

2019

Matthew K. Gold and Lauren F. Klein, Editors

Debates in the Digital Humanities 2019

Debates in the Digital Humanities 2019 collects a broad array of important, thought-provoking perspectives on the field’s many sides. With a wide range of subjects including gender-based assumptions made by algorithms, the place of the digital humanities within art history, and data-based methods for exhuming forgotten histories, it assembles a who’s who of the field in more than thirty impactful essays.

Ten years ago I asked what digital humanities was and what it was doing in English departments. This volume reveals the limits of that question—disciplinarily, methodologically, politically, and imaginatively. The Debates in the Digital Humanities series continues to define the field in the most expansive and provocative ways possible.

Matthew Kirschenbaum, University of Maryland

Contending with recent developments like the shocking 2016 U.S. Presidential election, the radical transformation of the social web, and passionate debates about the future of data in higher education, Debates in the Digital Humanities 2019

Debates in the Digital Humanities 2019

Debates in the Digital Humanities 2019

Ten years ago I asked what digital humanities was and what it was doing in English departments. This volume reveals the limits of that question—disciplinarily, methodologically, politically, and imaginatively. The Debates in the Digital Humanities series continues to define the field in the most expansive and provocative ways possible.

Matthew Kirschenbaum, University of Maryland

This latest installment in the Debates in the Digital Humanities series continues the important work of prising open computational black boxes and of connecting code to culture. The essays collected here are sharp, smart, and political as they tackle crucial issues of race, gender, sexuality, affect, ethics, and more. They also point the way toward a more vibrant and inclusive Digital Humanities.

Tara McPherson, author of Feminist in a Software Lab: Difference + Design