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The State University, Its Work and Problems

A Selection from Addresses Delivered Between 1921 and 1933

Author:

Lotus Delta Coffman

The State University, Its Work and Problems

These papers make up the most complete and competent statement of the function of the state university which has been made in any quarter. Always logical, realistic, and temperate, the argument is buttressed by the fact and shrewd observation . . . The book will be valued by everyone who is concerned with the cause of public education.

Journal of Higher Education

The State University: Its Work and Problems was first published in 1934. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions.

This presentation of the views of the late University of Minnesota president, Lotus Delta Coffman, emphasizes his contention that state-supported institutions of higher learning should be open to all who have the ability to profit by the work offered in them.

The State University, Its Work and Problems

Lotus D. Coffman was president of the University of Minnesota from 1920 until 1938. He is the author of Freedom Through Education, a memorial essay published by the University of Minnesota Press in the year of his death, 1938.

The State University, Its Work and Problems

These papers make up the most complete and competent statement of the function of the state university which has been made in any quarter. Always logical, realistic, and temperate, the argument is buttressed by the fact and shrewd observation . . . The book will be valued by everyone who is concerned with the cause of public education.

Journal of Higher Education

These speeches furnish something of a clew to those qualities of intellect and personality which have made President Coffman the outstanding administrator that he is. He is unafraid to speak out clearly and concisely when he knows that the cause he advocates is one that should prevail. He stands out as a sympathetic student of the needs and the aspirations of the great mass of the people, as well as the needs of the large institution which he heads and of education generally.

Minneapolis Tribune

Presents an insight into and a respect for the great American tradition of universal free education that is at once refreshing and stimulating.

Nation’s Schools