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The People Named the Chippewa

Narrative Histories

1984
Author:

Gerald Vizenor

The People Named the Chippewa

Ranging in time and space from Madeline Island and the reservations of northern Minnesota to the urban reservation of Minneapolis-St. Paul, Vizenor recounts the experiences of the Chippewa and their encounters with the white people who “named” them.

Ranging in time and space from Madeline Island and the reservations of northern Minnesota to the urban reservation of Minneapolis-St. Paul, Vizenor recounts the experiences of the Chippewa and their encounters with the white people who “named” them.

“Vizenor appears to be the Isaac Bashevis Singer of the Chippewa: he combines an extremely keen eye for detail and an appreciation for an interesting story with a scrupulous sense of honesty.” Alan Velie

Ranging in time and space from Madeline Island and the reservations of northern Minnesota to the urban reservation of Minneapolis-St. Paul, Vizenor recounts the experiences of the Chippewa and their encounters with the white people who "named" them.

"Through some very funny moments, Vizenor raises serious questions for the pan-Indian movements and 'radical' academics. A teacher and scholar wishing to avoid and to correct the mistakes of twentieth-century scholarship in discussing 'Indians,' 'Native Americans' or 'Amerindians' would do well to begin with these stories; they are the strength of the Anishinaabeg." World Literature Today

The People Named the Chippewa

Gerald Vizenor is the author of Wordarrows (1978), Earthdivers (1981), The Trickster of Liberty (1988), Interior Landscapes (1990), Griever (1990), and Bearheart (1990).

The People Named the Chippewa

“Vizenor appears to be the Isaac Bashevis Singer of the Chippewa: he combines an extremely keen eye for detail and an appreciation for an interesting story with a scrupulous sense of honesty.” Alan Velie

“Through some very funny moments, Vizenor raises serious questions for the pan-Indian movements and ‘radical’ academics. A teacher and scholar wishing to avoid and to correct the mistakes of twentieth-century scholarship in discussing ‘Indians,’ ‘Native Americans’ or ‘Amerindians’ would do well to begin with these stories; they are the strength of the Anishinaabeg.” World Literature Today