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Nazi Psychoanalysis v2

Volume II

2002
Author:

Laurence A. Rickels
Foreword by Benjamin Bennett

Nazi Psychoanalysis v2

A revolutionary new approach to the place of Nazi ideology in twentieth-century thought

In volume II, Crypto-Fetishism, Rickels demonstrates the surprising degree to which the Nazi moral system parallels that of psychoanalysis, particularly in their common projection and protection of homosexuality.

This is a challenging work, alternately fascinating and infuriating, and it resists being summarized or distilled into one or several essential contributions. Compelling and persuasive. He brilliantly traces discourses on the relationship between pilots and their aircraft, spinning out all kinds of associations around men and machines, treating psychoanalysis as a kind of priviledged discourse on the ‘ongoing technologization of our bodies’ that ran through the twentieth century.

Times Literary Supplement

Psychoanalysis was a symptom of everything the Nazis reviled: an intellectual assault on Kultur largely perpetrated by Jews. It was also, as this remarkable work shows, an inescapable symptom of modernity, practiced, transformed, and perpetuated by and within the Nazi regime. A sweeping, magisterial work by one of the most incisive and interesting scholars of modern philosophy, theory, and culture, Nazi Psychoanalysis studies the breadth of this phenomenon in order to clarify and deepen our understanding not only of psychoanalysis but of the twentieth century.

Tracing the intersections of psychoanalysis and Nazism, Laurence A. Rickels discovers startling conjunctions and continuities in writers as diverse as Adler and Adorno, Kafka and Goethe, Lacan, H. Rider Haggard, and Heidegger; and in works as different as Der Golem, Civilization and Its Discontents, Frankenstein, Faust, and Brave New World. In a richly allusive style, he writes of psychoanalysis in multifarious incarnations, of the concept and actual history of "insurance," of propaganda in theory and practice, of psychological warfare, Walt Disney, and the Frankfurt School debates—a dizzying tour of the twentieth century that helps us see how the "corridor wars" that arise in the course of theoretical, clinical, social, political, and cultural attempts to describe the human psyche are related to the world wars of the century in an intimate and infinitely complicated manner.

Though some have used its appropriation by the Nazis to brand psychoanalysis with the political odium of fascism, Rickels instead finds an uncanny convergence—one that suggests far-reaching possibilities for both psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic criticism. His work, with its enormous intellectual and historical span, makes a persuasive argument that no element of modernity—not psychoanalysis any more than Marxism or deconstruction, cultural revolutions or technological advances—can be adequately understood without a thorough consideration of its Nazi component.

Nazi Psychoanalysis v2

Laurence A. Rickels is professor of German and comparative literature at the University of California at Santa Barbara. His books include The Vampire Lectures (1999), The Case of California (2001), and the edited volume Acting Out in Groups (1999), all published by Minnesota.

Nazi Psychoanalysis v2

This is a challenging work, alternately fascinating and infuriating, and it resists being summarized or distilled into one or several essential contributions. Compelling and persuasive. He brilliantly traces discourses on the relationship between pilots and their aircraft, spinning out all kinds of associations around men and machines, treating psychoanalysis as a kind of priviledged discourse on the ‘ongoing technologization of our bodies’ that ran through the twentieth century.

Times Literary Supplement

Rickels provides an idiosyncratic and illuminating new look at the meaning of psychoanalysis in the Third Reich. Eschewing straightforward narrative for a prismatic account of the twists and turns of psychoanalysts who collaborated to survive, he offers a gripping history of the phenomenon of what made the Nazis think like Nazis.

Sander L. Gilman, The University of Illinois at Chicago

Rickels’s writing is marvelously witty, ironic, erudite, and original . . . unlike some critics who would read the Nazi appropriation of psychoanalysis as a sign of the politically odious character of psychoanalysis itself, Rickels reads the convergence as ‘uncanny’ and offers, in his very reading, another possibility for psychoanalytic criticism besides the one that forms the topic of this text.

Judith Butler, University of California, Berkeley

Rickels has unearthed a mass of fascinating information about the underground life of psychoanalysis during the Nazi period. His book will constitute a provocative contribution both to psychoanalysis and to studies of Nazi Germany.

Fredric R. Jameson, Duke University

Nazi Psychoanalysis v2

CONTENTS

Foreword BENJAMINBENNETT
Achtung
A PREFACE TO NAZI PSYCHOANALYSIS

Part Too
Time to Remember
Giving Up Which Ghost?
Keeping Up
Take Off
Fetish Goes to War
Halfway
Ghost Appearances
The Heydays of Radarr
Another Allied Example
One Four Five Beachwood Drive
Cyber-Lacan
French Dressing
The Game
Trippy
On Turing
Reopener
Air Head
Into Africa
1945: There’s Still a Place for Psychoanalysis
1945 Allied-Style
Taking Apart
Air Defense Mechanisms
Bomber Room
Little Richard
Emergency Island
Bloody Freud
Bion the Pleasure Principle
The Father’s Daughter
Breaking Up and Making Up
Project Group Identification
In My Side
Objection Relations
There Was No Time like the Present
Kinder-Reich
Soldierhood
Let Me Introduce You
Secret Wartime Report
Heil Homosexuality
Schultz Complex
Council of Marriage
Mohr Therapy
Hands-on Reproach
The Women
Colonization
Taking Part
Buffoonery
Back in the U.S. of A.
Boring
Consensual Text
Getting to Know You
Furer
A Couple of Fetishes
Parting
Mummy’s the Word
Hi Ya Heidegger
Being in Therapy
The 30 Percent Reich
Hey Sullivan Man
Drama Psycho
Dichten Denken Tanken
Only One Thing Missing

R e f e r e n c e s
F i l m o g r a p h y

I n d e x