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Male Trouble

1992

Constance Penley and Sharon Willis, editors

Male Trouble

The contributors provide a thought-provoking, comprehensive study of masculinity in American culture today.

The contributors provide a thought-provoking, comprehensive study of masculinity in American culture today.

Contributors: Parveen Adams, Ian Balfour, Ray Barrie, Sabrina Barton, Steven Cohan, Rey Chow, Alexander Doty, Henry Jenkins III, Lynne Kirby, Constance Penley, Kaja Silverman, Sasha Torres, and Sharon Willis.

Bold, innovative, and sophisticated.

Judith Mayne

The contributors provide a thought-provoking, comprehensive study of masculinity in American culture today.

Contributors: Parveen Adams, Ian Balfour, Ray Barrie, Sabrina Barton, Steven Cohan, Rey Chow, Alexander Doty, Henry Jenkins III, Lynne Kirby, Constance Penley, Kaja Silverman, Sasha Torres, and Sharon Willis.

Male Trouble

Constance Penley teaches film studies and women’s studies at the University of California at Santa Barbara. She is the author of The Future of an Illusion: Film, Feminism, and Psychoanalysis (Minnesota, 1989); editor of Feminism and Film Theory; and coeditor (with Andrew Ross of Technoculture (Minnesota, 1991) and (with Elisabeth Lyon, Lynn Spigel, and Janet Bergstrom) of Close Encounters: Film, Feminism, and Science Fiction (Minnesota, 1991).

Sharon Willis is associate professor in the Department of Foreign Languages, Literature, and Linguistics at the University of Rochester, where she teaches French, comparative literature, film, and women’s studies. She is the author of Marguerite Duras: Writing on the Body, and is currently completing a book entitled Public Fantasies: Gender and Race in Contemporary Film.

Male Trouble

Bold, innovative, and sophisticated.

Judith Mayne

Male Trouble upholds a strongly anti-monolithic line on the creation and affirmation of contemporary masculinities. This collection would be valuable in a course on contemporary men’s and/or gay studies. Useful as well to feminist, gender, film/video, pop culture, and psychoanalytic critics. Male Trouble is a book it might be hard to keep off our favorite syllabi.

Southern Humanities Review