Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

Navigation

Knowing Nukes

The Politics and Culture of the Atom

1992
Author:

William Chaloupka

Knowing Nukes

Countering critics who charge that postmodern positions on language, authority, and power cannot inform effective political responses, this compelling analysis employs these same methods to examine antinuclear politics. Star Wars (the movie and the antimissile system), the Freeze movement, Reaganism, and “lifestyle” politics all receive new treatments.

Countering critics who charge that postmodern positions on language, authority, and power cannot inform effective political responses, this compelling analysis employs these same methods to examine antinuclear politics. Star Wars (the movie and the antimissile system), the Freeze movement, Reaganism, and “lifestyle” politics all receive new treatments.

“William Chaloupka has the extraordinary ability to take a fairly esoteric domain of theory and apply it to a contemporary issue in a way that should be palpable to a wide audience. Knowing Nukes is thoughtful and sensitive, and it is a masterful blend of ‘high theory’ and popular culture.” Michael Shapiro, The University of Hawaii at Manoa

Countering critics who charge that postmodern positions on language, authority, and power cannot inform effective political responses, this compelling analysis employs these same methods to examine antinuclear politics. Star Wars (the movie and the antimissile system), the Freeze movement, Reaganism, and “lifestyle” politics all receive new treatments.

Knowing Nukes

William Chaloupka teaches political science at the University of Montana. He is coeditor, with William Stearns, of Jean Baudrillard: The Disappearance of Art and Politics.

Knowing Nukes

“William Chaloupka has the extraordinary ability to take a fairly esoteric domain of theory and apply it to a contemporary issue in a way that should be palpable to a wide audience. Knowing Nukes is thoughtful and sensitive, and it is a masterful blend of ‘high theory’ and popular culture.” Michael Shapiro, The University of Hawaii at Manoa