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How Social Movements Matter

1999

Marco Giugni, Doug McAdam, and Charles Tilly, editors
Foreword by Sidney Tarrow

How Social Movements Matter

Provides original assessments of the consequences of social movements.

We have all witnessed social movements and felt their effects-some subtle, others profound. This volume brings together well-known scholars to assess the impact of such movements over time in different countries, and on various segments of society.

Contributors: Edwin Amenta, Paul Burstein, Donatella della Porta, Joyce Gelb, Vivien Hart, Ruud Koopmans, Hanspeter Kriesi, David S. Meyer, Kelly Moore, Dieter Rucht, Paul Statham, Sidney Tarrow, Dominique Wisler, Michael P. Young.

“Marco Giugni, Doug McAdam and Charles Tilly have put together a subversive reader. They and their collaborators strike out boldly to detect, discriminate, and define the outcomes of social movements. They provide a road map of the current state of research on movement outcomes, open that map out to unexplored provinces, and put high test gasoline in the engine. In the process, they threaten to broaden the field of social movements into a general approach to contentious politics; the field will be the richer for their efforts.” Sidney Tarrow, from the Foreword

We have all witnessed social movements and felt their effects-some subtle, others profound. But to truly understand their impact over time, in different countries, and on various segments of society requires the kind of rare insight this book provides. Bringing together several well-known scholars, this volume offers an assessment of the consequences of social movements in Western countries.

Policy, institutional, cultural, short- and long-term, and intended and unintended outcomes are among the types of consequences the authors consider in depth. They also compare political outcomes of several contemporary movements-specifically, twomen’s, peace, ecology, and extreme-right movements-in different countries.

Contributors: Edwin Amenta, New York U; Paul Burstein, U of Washington; Donatella della Porta, U of Florence; Joyce Gelb, CUNY; Vivien Hart, U of Sussex; Ruud Koopmans, Science Center, Berlin; Hanspeter Kriesi, U of Geneva; David S. Meyer, CUNY; Kelly Moore, Columbia U; Dieter Rucht, U of Kent, Canterbury; Paul Statham, Science Center, Berlin; Sidney Tarrow, Cornell U; Dominique Wisler, U of Geneva; Michael P. Young.

ISBN 0-8166-2914-5 Cloth £00.00 $57.95xx
ISBN 0-8166-2915-3 Paper £00.00 $22.95x
336 Pages 10 tables, 4 figures 5 7/8 x 9 August
Social Movements, Protest and Contention Series, volume 10
Translation inquiries: University of Minnesota Press

How Social Movements Matter

Marco Giugni is a researcher at the University of Geneva. Doug McAdam is professor of sociology at Stanford University. Charles Tilly is Joseph L. Buttenweiser Professor of Social Science at Columbia University.

How Social Movements Matter

“Marco Giugni, Doug McAdam and Charles Tilly have put together a subversive reader. They and their collaborators strike out boldly to detect, discriminate, and define the outcomes of social movements. They provide a road map of the current state of research on movement outcomes, open that map out to unexplored provinces, and put high test gasoline in the engine. In the process, they threaten to broaden the field of social movements into a general approach to contentious politics; the field will be the richer for their efforts.” Sidney Tarrow, from the Foreword

The book provides a comprehensive overview of theoretical, methodological, and empirical work on outcomes, and moves forward by considering discourse and frames along with political opportunity structures. It is a must read for those who seek a more nuanced understanding of the variety of ways that movements contribute to social change. Beyond that, it provides a good overview of social movement theories and processes, and as such is worthwhile for course use.

Nancy Whittier, Contemporary Sociology

“How Social Movements Matter will be of broad interest to social movement scholars because the authors explore significant questions about the internal and external accounts of movement activism, historicize social action in various cultural contexts, and demonstrate the reliability and longevity of various forms of social change. Essential reading for those interested in pursuing outcomes measurement scholarship. Without question a necessary contribution, and a welcome addition to the field of social movement scholarship.” Mobilization