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Feminist Waves, Feminist Generations

Life Stories from the Academy

2007

Hokulani K. Aikau, Karla A. Erickson, and Jennifer L. Pierce, editors

Feminist Waves, Feminist Generations

Finding the “2.5 generation”—an alternative to binary feminist categories

Feminist Waves, Feminist Generations challenges the static figuring of feminist generations that positions the second wave of feminist scholars against a homogeneous third wave.

Contributors: Sam Bullington, Susan Cahn, Dawn Rae Davis, Lisa J. Disch, Sara Evans, Elizabeth Faue, Roderick A. Ferguson, Peter Hennen, Wendy Leo Moore, Toni McNaron, Jean M. O’Brien, Felicity Schaeffer-Grabiel, Anne Firor Scott, Janet D. Spector, Amanda Lock Swarr, Miglena Todorova.

This collection will no doubt find its place on the shelves, and in the hands, of young feminist scholars.

Curve

Feminist Waves, Feminist Generations challenges the static figuring of feminist generations that positions the second wave of feminist scholars against a homogeneous third wave. Based on life stories from contemporary feminist scholars, this volume emphasizes how feminism develops unevenly over time and across institutions and, ultimately, offers a new paradigm for theorizing the intersections between generations and feminist waves of thought.

Contributors: Sam Bullington, U of Missouri; Susan Cahn, SUNY Buffalo; Dawn Rae Davis, U of Minnesota; Lisa J. Disch, U of Minnesota; Sara Evans, U of Minnesota; Elizabeth Faue, Wayne State U; Roderick A. Ferguson, U of Minnesota; Peter Hennen, Ohio State U at Newark; Wendy Leo Moore, Texas A&M U; Toni McNaron, U of Minnesota; Jean M. O’Brien, U of Minnesota; Felicity Schaeffer-Grabiel, U of California, Santa Cruz; Anne Firor Scott, Duke U; Janet D. Spector, U of Minnesota; Amanda Lock Swarr, U of Washington, Seattle; Miglena Todorova, U of Minnesota.

Feminist Waves, Feminist Generations

Hokulani K. Aikau is assistant professor of political science at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa. She received her B.S. in women’s studies and sociology from the University of Utah in 1994, her M.A. in sociology from the Center for Research on Women at The University of Memphis in 1996, and her Ph.D. in American studies from the University of Minnesota in 2005. Her dissertation research was supported by a Ford Foundation Fellowship as well as a MacArthur Scholar Fellowship. She is now revising her dissertation into a book, tentatively titled Negotiations of Faith: Mormonism, Native Hawaiian Identity, and Struggles for Self-Determination.



Karla A. Erickson is assistant professor in sociology at Grinnell College. She received her Ph.D. in American studies, with a minor in feminist studies, at the University of Minnesota in 2004; her M.A. in liberal studies from Hamline University in 1998; and her B.A. in English and women’s studies at Illinois Wesleyan in 1995. She is working on a book that examines the role of gendered labor in the service sector. Her work has been published in Symbolic Interaction, Space and Culture, and Qualitative Sociology.

Jennifer L. Pierce is associate professor of sociology and American studies, a former director of the Center for Advanced Feminist Studies, and a former editorial board member of Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society at the University of Minnesota. Her publications include Gender Trials: Emotional Lives in Contemporary Law Firms and a coedited anthology, Is Academic Feminism Dead? Theory in Practice. She is working on a book tentatively titled Racing for Innocence: Whiteness, Corporate Culture, and the Backlash against Affirmative Action and on a collaborative project with M. J. Maynes on the uses of personal narratives in the social sciences. She received her Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California at Berkeley in 1991.

Feminist Waves, Feminist Generations

This collection will no doubt find its place on the shelves, and in the hands, of young feminist scholars.

Curve

I suggest you give copies of this book as a gift to your favorite graduate students when they get their first academic positions. They will need the foreknowledge to arm themselves against the perennial vicissitudes of academic politics, especially if they do not fit the conventional mode whatever it is in their time and space.

Contemporary Sociology