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Consuming Modernity

Public Culture in a South Asian World

1995

Carol A. Breckenridge, editor

Consuming Modernity

Illustrates that what is distinctive of any particular society is not the fact of its modernity, but rather its own unique debates about modernity. Behind the embattled arena of culture in India, for example, lie particular social and political interests such as the growing middle class; the entrepreneurs and commercial institutions; and the state. The contributors address the roles of these various intertwined interests in the making of India's public culture, each examining different sites of consumption. The sites they explore include cinema, radio, cricket, restaurants, and tourism. Consuming Modernity also makes clear the differences among public, mass, and popular culture.

Illustrates that what is distinctive of any particular society is not the fact of its modernity, but rather its own unique debates about modernity. Behind the embattled arena of culture in India, for example, lie particular social and political interests such as the growing middle class; the entrepreneurs and commercial institutions; and the state. The contributors address the roles of these various intertwined interests in the making of India's public culture, each examining different sites of consumption. The sites they explore include cinema, radio, cricket, restaurants, and tourism. Consuming Modernity also makes clear the differences among public, mass, and popular culture.

Contributors include Arjun Appadurai, Frank F. Conlon, Sara Dickey, Paul Greenough, David Lelyveld, Barbara N. Ramusack, Rosie Thomas, and Phillip B. Zarrilli.

Consuming Modernity illustrates that what is distinctive of any particular society is not the fact of its modernity, but rather its own unique debates about modernity. Behind the embattled arena of culture in India, for example, lie particular social and political interests such as the growing middle class; the entrepreneurs and commercial institutions; and the state.

The contributors address the roles of these various intertwined interests in the making of India's public culture, each examining different sites of consumption. The sites they explore include cinema, radio, cricket, restaurants, and tourism. Consuming Modernity also makes clear the differences among public, mass, and popular culture.

Contributors include Arjun Appadurai, University of Chicago; Frank F. Conlon, University of Washington; Sara Dickey, Bowdoin College; Paul Greenough, University of Iowa; David Lelyveld, Columbia University; Barbara N. Ramusack, University of Cincinnati; Rosie Thomas, University of Westminster; and Phillip B. Zarrilli, University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Consuming Modernity

Carol Breckenridge teaches at the University of Chicago. She is coeditor, with Peter van der Veer, of Orientalism and the Postcolonial Predicament, and editor of the journal Public Culture.

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