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A Short History of Canada for Americans

Author:

Alfred Leroy Burt

A Short History of Canada for Americans

In this study are set forth some aspects of Canadian development which Americans should understand and appreciate. The first part of the book deals with the period of French rule and the struggle between England and France for North America. It could have been written only by one whose knowledge is both wide and deep. Out of the fabric of the complex story of this era emerges the design of Canada’s growth clearly outlined but always related to its background, the history of the western world. The latter part of the book does not quite measure up to the first in this respect, but the pattern is there--more intricate but not blurred and never out of focus.

Among the factors of Canadian history to which the author directs attention are the fur trade, geographical environment, the opening of the West, relations with the United States, Canada’s leadership in the evolution of the British Commonwealth of Nations, and one very little understood in this country--the role of the French Canadians....

Carefully selected illustrations and useful maps make this work both more attractive and more intelligible. -Edith Dobie, University of Washington

-JSTOR: The Pacific Historical Review, Vol. 11, No. 3 (Sep., 1942). pp. 335-336

A Short History of Canada for Americans

Alfred Leroy Burt was a professor emeritus of history at the University of Minnesota.

A Short History of Canada for Americans

In this study are set forth some aspects of Canadian development which Americans should understand and appreciate. The first part of the book deals with the period of French rule and the struggle between England and France for North America. It could have been written only by one whose knowledge is both wide and deep. Out of the fabric of the complex story of this era emerges the design of Canada’s growth clearly outlined but always related to its background, the history of the western world. The latter part of the book does not quite measure up to the first in this respect, but the pattern is there--more intricate but not blurred and never out of focus.

Among the factors of Canadian history to which the author directs attention are the fur trade, geographical environment, the opening of the West, relations with the United States, Canada’s leadership in the evolution of the British Commonwealth of Nations, and one very little understood in this country--the role of the French Canadians....

Carefully selected illustrations and useful maps make this work both more attractive and more intelligible. -Edith Dobie, University of Washington

-JSTOR: The Pacific Historical Review, Vol. 11, No. 3 (Sep., 1942). pp. 335-336