THE INVENTION OF PUBLIC SPACE virtual event with SACRPH and Mariana Mogilevich

Mariana Mogilevich will join a virtual event with the Society for American City and Regional Planning History (SACRPH) on Friday, May 21 for a discussion of her new book, THE INVENTION OF PUBLIC SPACE.
When May 21, 2021
from 12:00 PM to 13:00 PM
Where Virtual (more info below)
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The interplay of psychology, design, and politics in experiments with urban open spaceMariana Mogilevich will join a virtual event with the Society for American City and Regional Planning History (SACRPH) on Friday, May 21 at noon (1:00 p.m. Eastern) for a discussion of her new book, The Invention of Public Space: Designing for Inclusion in Lindsay's New York. She will be in conversation with Peter L'Official, author of Urban Legends: The South Bronx in Representation and Ruin, moderated by Brian Goldstein (Swarthmore College). Please register here to receive the virtual meeting information.

Mariana Mogilevich details a watershed moment when designers, government administrators, and residents sought to remake New York City in the image of a diverse, free, and democratic society. Combining psychology, politics, and design, she uncovers a critical moment of transformation in understanding city life and reveals the emergence of a concept of public space that remains today a powerful aspiration. 

"Deeply researched and wonderfully written, The Invention of Public Space will inspire a re-thinking of a concept—public space—and a place and time—New York City in the 1960s and ’70s—that we thought we knew well. Mariana Mogilevich captures the unique excitement of that moment when the top-down framework of modernist urban design and planning had collapsed and a new world of open, inclusive, and participatory design seemed to be beginning." —Robert Fishman, Taubman College of Architecture + Planning, University of Michigan

"Mariana Mogilevich avoids the expected judgements about the spaces she surveys—how ‘public’ were they, really?—and shows how the idea of ‘public space,’ with all its paradoxes and exclusions, was itself devised as a response to urban crisis in 1960s New York City. Pithy, clever, and wise, The Invention of Public Space is a much-needed reminder that ideas about self and society are at the heart of the cultural history of urbanism." —Samuel Zipp, coeditor of Vital Little Plans: The Short Works of Jane Jacobs