REMEMBERING OUR INTIMACIES virtual event with the Asian/Pacific/American Institute at New York University and Jamaica Heolimeleikalani Osorio

Jamaica Heolimeleikalani Osorio will join a virtual event with the Asian/Pacific/American Institute at New York University on Wednesday, February 16 for a discussion of her new book, REMEMBERING OUR INTIMACIES.
When Feb 16, 2022
from 17:00 PM to 18:30 PM
Where Virtual (more info below)
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Recovering Kānaka Maoli (Native Hawaiian) relationality and belonging in the land, memory, and body of Native Hawai’iJamaica Heolimeleikalani Osorio will join a virtual event with the Asian/Pacific/American Institute at New York University on Wednesday, February 16 at 5:00 p.m. (6:00 p.m. Eastern) for a discussion of her new book, Remembering Our Intimacies: Moʻolelo, Aloha ʻĀina, and Ea. Please check back for virtual meeting information.

Remembering Our Intimacies centers on the personal and embodied articulations of aloha ʻâina to detangle it from the effects of colonialism and occupation. Working at the intersections of Hawaiian knowledge, Indigenous queer theory, and Indigenous feminisms, it seeks to recuperate Native Hawaiian concepts and ethics around relationality, desire, and belonging grounded in the land, memory, and the body of Native Hawai’i.

"A stunning example of archival research, translation, and analysis, Remembering Our Intimacies is both a kāhea (call) and makana (gift), a truly inspiring offering to the lāhui and the fields of Native and queer studies. Jamaica Heolimeleikalani Osorio innovatively theorizes how Kānaka Maoli create multiple forms of pilina (intimacy) to manifest the responsibilities and possibilities of collective pleasure. This is the moʻolelo that queer Natives have been waiting for." —Lani Teves, author of Defiant Indigeneity: The Politics of Hawaiian Performance

"With a fearless commitment to land-based love, Jamaica Heolimeleikalani Osorio channels the multi-bodied powers of Hi‘iaka to cast an intimate yet expansive net of relating that reaches across geography, generation, and gender. Poetically moving from Hawaiian language archives to Mauna movement memories, this book creates both a refuge for queer Indigenous politics and a map for remembered futures." —Ty P. Kāwika Tengan, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa