CINEMA IS THE STRONGEST WEAPON presentation by Lorenzo Fabbri at Italian Film Festival of MSP

Lorenzo Fabbri will join the Italian Film Festival of Minneapolis / St. Paul for a presentation on his new book, CINEMA IS THE STRONGEST WEAPON, on Friday, March 1.
  • CINEMA IS THE STRONGEST WEAPON presentation by Lorenzo Fabbri at Italian Film Festival of MSP
  • 2024-03-01T10:00:00-06:00
  • 2024-03-01T11:00:00-06:00
  • Lorenzo Fabbri will join the Italian Film Festival of Minneapolis / St. Paul for a presentation on his new book, CINEMA IS THE STRONGEST WEAPON, on Friday, March 1.
When Mar 01, 2024
from 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
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A deep dive into Italian cinema under Mussolini’s regime and the filmmakers who used it as a means of antifascist resistanceLorenzo Fabbri will join the Italian Film Festival of Minneapolis / St. Paul for a presentation on his new book, Cinema is the Strongest Weapon: Race-Making and Resistance in Fascist Italy, on Friday, March 1 at 4:30 p.m. in Theater 3. This presentation is free and open to the public.

Professor Fabbri will also be hosting the Q&A following IFF's screening of C'eravamo tanto amati on Saturday, March 2 at 11:00 a.m. at the Main Cinema. 

More information about the Festival can be found here.

Cinema Is the Strongest Weapon examines how cinema was harnessed under the rule of Benito Mussolini as a political tool by both the reigning fascist regime and those who sought to resist it. Drawing incisive parallels to contemporary debates around race, whiteness, and authoritarianism, Lorenzo Fabbri presents an urgent view into the broader impact of visual media on culture and society.

"Lorenzo Fabbri’s book demonstrates how Italian Fascism wielded the cinematic apparatus to mobilize Italians as a racialized assemblage who would identify with the regime's myriad colonizing projects at home and abroad. That same apparatus was amenable to being hijacked by the resistance (embodied by Visconti and De Sica) to formulate plural, antifascist ways of living. A refreshing and beautifully written work, Cinema Is the Strongest Weapon adds considerable nuance to our understandings of how Fascism works, and is actively contested, through film." —Rhiannon Noel Welch, author of Vital Subjects: Race and Biopolitics in Italy

"A richly researched and politically urgent exploration of how cinema under Mussolini worked to assemble Italians into a fascist collectivity mobilized less by ideological consent than racial affect. By attending to filmmaking as race-making, from Luigi Pirandello to Roberto Rossellini, Lorenzo Fabbri illuminates how—building on liberal policies of internal colonization and external colonialism—Italian Fascism embarked on a biopolitical project to forge a unified, ‘whitened’ body politic committed to a melodramatic brand of imperialism. Cinema Is the Strongest Weapon unsettles film histories and theories that pivot on the ‘Year Zero’ of Italian neorealism, challenging us to rethink the entanglements of race, media, and authoritarianism while also attending to how cinema could be made useless for Fascism." —Alberto Toscano, author of Late Fascism: Race, Capitalism, and the Politics of Crisis