DISCOMFORT FOOD virtual event with the University of Kansas Hall Center for the Humanities, the Lawrence Public Library, and Marni Kessler

Marni Kessler will host a virtual event with the University of Kansas Hall Center for the Humanities and the Lawrence Public Library on Wednesday, April 28 for a discussion of her new book, DISCOMFORT FOOD.
When Apr 28, 2021
from 19:30 PM to 20:30 PM
Where Virtual (more info below)
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An intricate and provocative journey through nineteenth-century depictions of food and the often uncomfortable feelings they evoke 

 
 
 Marni Kessler will host a virtual event with the University of Kansas Hall Center for the Humanities and the Lawrence Public Library on Wednesday, April 28 at 7:30 p.m. for a discussion of her new book, Discomfort Food: The Culinary Imagination in Late Nineteenth-Century French Art as part of the Meet KU's Authors series. Please register here to receive the virtual meeting information.

In Discomfort Food, scholar Marni Reva Kessler trains her inquisitive eye on the depictions of food in nineteenth-century French art. Arguing that disjointed senses of anxiety, nostalgia, and melancholy underlie the superficial abundance in works by Manet, Degas, and others, Kessler shows how, in their images, food presented a spectrum of pleasure and unease associated with modern life.

"Intensely personal and beautifully written, Discomfort Food takes up the uncanny undertow of the apparently anodyne genre of still life in nineteenth-century France. Marni Reva Kessler brings to bear all the memories and associations attendant upon things like a fish stew in the making or an outsized mound of butter and eggs, weaving her readings of these works together with fascinating visual comparisons and a vast array of historical knowledge about the pressures informing the making, consumption, and representation of food." —Carol Armstrong, Yale University

"Marni Reva Kessler invites us on a compelling personal journey in food and art that begins with Manet’s still life, Poisson, etc. Fishy dead bodies abound in this gruesome whodunit. The detective, a sinister wet eel, sniffs and snakes through the evidence: a wide-eyed gurnard, a gasping mullet, a lemon flashing a yellow warning, and oysters cowering in the background. All of this in exquisite prose, as sharp as a knife." —Thomas Parker, author of Tasting French Terroir: The History of an Idea

"Discomfort Food reads like a novel. I turned the pages with bated breath, waiting for ‘what would happen’ in the unfolding of a series of dazzling arguments. This is fine stuff, each word wrapped in a dappled tone and lush register conveying, like the glowing fruits in Caillebotte's painting or the nacred fish scales and oyster shells in Manet’s fish painting, a gorgeousness of effect." —Janet Beizer, Harvard University