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Book reviews collection for homepage

Community Reporter: Horticulture as the art and science of growing
Review of A FIELD GUIDE TO THE NATURAL WORLD OF THE TWIN CITIES.
neural.it: Archaeologies of Touch
A remarkable book, solidly documented and will potentially enlighten a vast number of people working with cultural and social technologies.
When We Talk About Animals: Sue Savage-Rumbaugh
Sue Savage-Rumbaugh on speaking with bonobos, humanity’s closest living relatives
Eden Prairie News: Documenting Twin Cities wildlife
The senior manager of wildlife for the Three Rivers Park District and the former director of the Springbrook Nature Center in Fridley have come together to create a book on the habitats and wildlife of the Twin Cities.
When the ice melts.
4.5 out of 5 stars for Sarah Stonich's LAURENTIAN DIVIDE.
Flavorwire’s Ultimate Gift Guide for the Pop Culture Aficionado In Your Life
With Werner Herzog's Scenarios and Scenarios II.
Star Tribune: Holiday Books Guide
Includes Hush Hush, Forest; The Great Minnesota Cookie Book; and Metropolitan Dreams.
Pioneer Press: 15 good reads for the grown-ups on your holiday gift list
Finish the Thanksgiving leftovers, put away the good china and start thinking holiday gifts. For the adult readers on your list, here are 15 books by Minnesota writers published this year. All have been praised for good writing that combines exciting plots with interesting characters.
Publishers Weekly: Iron Curtain Journals
Fans will find fresh nuances and a richly intimate and immersive atmosphere.
PRI: Indigenous chef Sean Sherman wants you to know the truth behind Thanksgiving
"When you read about history, you read a lot about the hardships that happened between the colonists and the Native peoples that were living there on the East Coast," said Sherman. "And a lot of really brutal stories come out of that history."
The New Republic: Retirement in America? Too Expensive.
A new book examines the lives of expats in Ecuador and their struggle to stay in the middle class.
Film International: Rehistoricizing the Gaze
Elena Gorfinkel’s Lewd Looks: American Sexploitation Cinema in the 1960s
INTO: How Race and Trans Identity Emerged Together
Black transgender scholar and Cornell University professor C. Riley Snorton’s Black on Both Sides: A Racial History of Trans Identity offers a groundbreaking approach to the interlocking pasts of racial and trans identity.
Popmatters: Allen Ginsberg's Journals Offer Insight into Poetry, Culture, and Politics During the Cold War
The reader who is familiar with Howl will find a similar experience in reading Ginsberg's journals: words and scenes rush at you like a tidal wave, leaving you immersed and breathless, then, with surprising immediacy, lift you to another scene, sometimes frantic, sometimes serene.
TIME Magazine: The Thanksgiving Tale We Tell Is a Harmful Lie.
Every November, I get asked an unfortunate, loaded question: “You’re a Native American—what do you eat on Thanksgiving?” My answer spans my lifetime.
Star Tribune Wingnut blog: A Field Guide to the Natural World of the Twin Cities.
Buy two copies of this book. One for yourself, the other a gift.
CBS Sunday Morning: The Sioux Chef
"You can throw a dart at a map of North America, and wherever it lands, there's gonna be culture, food, people and flavor to play with right there, and so many stories to tell you can write a book," said chef Sean Sherman. And he's done just that.
Off the Menu with Dara Moskowitz Grumdahl: The Great Minnesota Cookie Book
Are bar cookies cookies?
Kare 11: Great Minnesota Cookie Book recipes
'The Great Minnesota Cookie Book,' by Lee Svitak Dean and Rick Nelson, of the Star Tribune, is a compilation of 80 winning recipes and stories from bakers around the state who have entered the Holiday Cookie Contest at the Star Tribune. Lee is the food editor and Rick is the restaurant critic and staff writer for the Taste section.
Washington Post: Why Thanksgiving isn’t necessarily a celebration: a Native American writer’s take
Plenty of native people still celebrate the holiday, too. Everyone has the time off, and no one is against gratitude. It’s complicated.