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Publishers Weekly: The Contest
This durable history underlines all the nuances for readers who lived it and showcases the period’s drama for readers new to one of the defining sagas of the ’60s.
Radical Philosophy: A Deleuze for intolerable times
This book follows in a sequence of deaths: Nietzsche’s Death of God (after Feuerbach), Foucault’s Death of Man, and now, with Andrew Culp, the Death of this World. As with its predecessors, Culp’s announcement of death is also an attempt at its actualisation. The book begs us to inhabit a deep pessimism: to ‘give up on all the reasons given for saving this world’. In Nietzsche, it is Zarathustra who makes the announcement of death. For Culp, the harbinger of doom goes by the name of ‘Dark Deleuze’.
MPR: Where to find native Minnesota wildflowers
If you want to see native Minnesota wildflowers this weekend, you should head to Jay Cooke or Banning state parks. That's the expert recommendation of writer Phyllis Root and photographer Kelly Povo.
The 13 enthralling science fiction and fantasy books you need to check out
Adventures in space, machines run amok, and more to add to your reading list
International Falls Journal: History on tap / Howard Greene
Howard Greene was a not only a Milwaukee businessman and father to four children, but starting in 1906, he added adventurer to his achievements as well; making extensive canoe expeditions into the wilderness with his young sons, a few of his outdoorsmen friends, and a few of his sons’ school friends.
WTIP: Breakfast with Beatrice
Beatrice Ojakangas is the author of 31 cookbooks, and has been a food writer and columnist for many publications including Bon Appetit, Gourmet, and the Minneapolis Star Tribune. She joined The Roadhouse to talk about her latest cookbook, "Breakfast with Beatrice."
Pioneer Press: Gilded Age true crime book centers on Minneapolis
If you’ve never heard of Harry Hayward you’ll love reading about this serial seducer, con man, gambler and crook in Shawn Francis Peters’ “The Infamous Harry Hayward” (University of Minnesota Press).
Pet Sounds: Why we love pet photos
Capturing animals in photos hasn't always been about cute cats and goofy dogs.
Kare 11: Breakfast with Beatrice
Beatrice Ojakangas, author of Breakfast with Beatrice, stopped in the KARE 11 Kitchen to whip up a delicious pancake to share.
The Architect's Newspaper: 2018 Summer Reading List
When did the modern age begin? The advent of refrigeration and climate control allowed for the mass distribution of food, the rise of tall buildings, and new advances in occupancy comfort. With so many more options for controlling the interior environment, architects took on a much more important role; and as Osman argues, played a major part in introducing the regulations that would standardize the centuries to come.
Largehearted Boy: Lemon Jail playlist
Lemon Jail: On the Road with the Replacements is an insightful and entertaining account of tour manager Bill Sullivan's time with the band.
There Are Better Ways To Fight Poverty Than Giving Money To Corporations
If we consume junk with no discernable use, we’ll help others we’ll never see while we continue to enjoy, and not question, our own privilege.
Voces Críticas: The Politics of Visibility & Undocumented Status
Interview with Rebecca Schreiber.
The best new cookbooks for summer meals
Featuring BREAKFAST WITH BEATRICE by Beatrice Ojakangas.
Boston Globe: Lemon Jail
Over the years, Boston has been friendly to many upstart rock bands, notably the Velvet Underground, who were a mainstay at the Tea Party in the ’60s, and U2, whose first foray to America brought them to the Paradise in 1980. The Hub was also home away from home for the Replacements, according to a new book by the band’s longtime roadie and unofficial fifth member, Bill Sullivan, who says the misfits from Minneapolis felt like they belonged in Boston.
Isthmus: A mesmerizing story
Peters’ scholarly, yet accessible, prose takes readers into the shadowy corners of Minneapolis and the sinister mind of a “man without a soul,” as Hayward was deemed. This sordid tale is packed with mesmerism, psychopathy, spiritualism, yellow journalism and capital punishment.
Make Wealth History: The Right to Be Cold
The Arctic is the front line of climate change. Because of global weather patterns, heat accumulates at the poles and the climate is changing twice as fast in the Arctic. The consequences are stark, and The Right to be Cold details them in this striking personal account of environmentalism in the North.
"An unusual and rather good memoir"
The Arctic is the front line of climate change. Because of global weather patterns, heat accumulates at the poles and the climate is changing twice as fast in the Arctic. The consequences are stark, and The Right to be Cold details them in this striking personal account of environmentalism in the North.
Searching for 'utopia' in 'Wild Mares'
A worthwhile look at non-traditional 20th century farming, and at Midwestern lesbian history.
Reading Matters: Add these to your summer list
Margi Preus’s burgeoning series promises to satisfy the cravings of young “whodunit” fans.