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Subprime Health

Debt and Race in U.S. Medicine

2017

Nadine Ehlers and Leslie R. Hinkson, Editors

Subprime Health

Moving beyond discussions of racial genomics, an interdisciplinary exploration of race-based medicine

From race-based pharmaceutical prescriptions and marketing, to race-targeted medical “hot spotting” and the Affordable Care Act, to stem-cell trial recruitment discourse, Subprime Health is a timely examination of race-based medicine as it intersects with the concept of debt. Utilizing an interdisciplinary perspective, this volume moves the discussion beyond debates over racial genomics and suggests fruitful new directions for future research.

From race-based pharmaceutical prescriptions and marketing, to race-targeted medical “hot spotting” and the Affordable Care Act, to stem-cell trial recruitment discourse, Subprime Health is a timely examination of race-based medicine as it intersects with the concept of debt.

The contributors to this volume propose that race-based medicine is inextricable from debt in two key senses. They first demonstrate how the financial costs related to race-based medicine disproportionately burden minorities, as well as how monetary debt and race are conditioned by broader relations of power. Second, the contributors investigate how race-based medicine is related to the concept of indebtedness and is often positioned as a way to pay back the debt that the medical establishment—and society at large—owes for the past and present neglect and abuses of many communities of color. By approaching the subject of race-based medicine from an interdisciplinary perspective—critical race studies, science and technology studies, public health, sociology, geography, and law—this volume moves the discussion beyond narrow and familiar debates over racial genomics and suggests fruitful new directions for future research.

Contributors: Ruha Benjamin, Princeton U; Catherine Bliss, U of California, San Francisco; Khiara M. Bridges, Boston U; Shiloh Krupar, Georgetown U; Jenna M. Loyd, U of Wisconsin–Milwaukee; Anne Pollock, Georgia Tech.

Subprime Health

Nadine Ehlers teaches in the Department of Sociology and Social Policy at the University of Sydney. She is author of Racial Imperatives: Discipline, Performativity, and Struggles against Subjection.

Leslie R. Hinkson is assistant professor of sociology at Georgetown University.

Subprime Health

Contents
Introduction: Race-Based Medicine and the Specter of Debt
Nadine Ehlers and Leslie R. Hinkson
Part I: Race-Based Medicine and Monetary Debt
1. The High Cost of Having Hypertension while Black in America
Leslie R. Hinkson
2. “When Treating Patients Like Criminals Makes Sense”: Medical Hot Spotting, Race, and Debt
Nadine Ehlers and Shiloh Krupar
3. Obamacare and Sovereign Debt: Race, Reparations, and the Haunting of Premature Death
Jenna M. Loyd
4. BiDil’s Compensation Relations
Anne Pollock
Part II: Race-Based Medicine and Indebtedness
5. The Meaning of Health Disparities
Catherine Bliss
6. What Do We Owe Each Other? Moral Debts and Racial Distrust in Experimental Stem Cell Science
Ruha Benjamin and Leslie R. Hinkson
7. Lessons from Racial Medicine: The Group, the Individual, and the Equal Protection Clause
Khiara M. Bridges
Conclusion: Freedom from Debt?
Leslie R. Hinkson and Nadine Ehlers
Acknowledgments
Contributors
Index