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Postcinematic Vision

The Coevolution of Moving-Image Media and the Spectator

2020
Author:

Roger F. Cook

Postcinematic Vision

A study of how film has continually intervened in our sense of perception, with far-ranging insights into the current state of lived experience

How has cinema transformed our senses, and how does it continue to do so? In Postcinematic Vision, Roger F. Cook posits film as a stage in the long coevolution of human consciousness and visual technology, offering a fresh perspective on the history of film while providing startling new insights into the so-called divide between cinematic and digital media.

How has cinema transformed our senses, and how does it continue to do so? Positing film as a stage in the long coevolution of human consciousness and visual technology, Postcinematic Visionoffer a fresh perspective on the history of film while providing startling new insights into the so-called divide between cinematic and digital media.

 

Starting with the argument that film viewing has long altered neural circuitry in our brains, Roger F. Cook proceeds to reevaluate film’s origins, as well as its merger with digital imaging in the 1990s. His animating argument is that film has continually altered the relation between media and human perception, challenging the visual nature of modern culture in favor of a more unified, pan-sensual way of perceiving. Through this approach, he makes original contributions to our understanding of how mediation is altering lived experience.

 

Along the way, Cook provides important reevaluations of well-known figures such as Franz Kafka, closely reading cinematic passages in the great author’s work; he reassesses the conventional wisdom that Marshall McLuhan was a technological determinist; and he lodges an original new reading of The Matrix. Full of provocative and far-reaching ideas, Postcinematic Vision is a powerful work that helps us see old concepts anew while providing new ideas for future investigation.

Postcinematic Vision

Roger F. Cook is professor of German studies and director of the Film Studies Program at the University of Missouri. He has written extensively on film and media theory, New German Cinema, and contemporary German film. He coedited The Cinema of Wim Wenders: Image, Narrative, and the Postmodern Condition and is coeditor of Berlin School Glossary: An ABC of the New Wave in German Cinema.

Postcinematic Vision

Contents


Introduction


Moving-Image Media and Embodied Spectatorship


Media Convergence and Remediation


1. Film and the Embodied Mind


Technogenesis: The Coevolution of the Biological and Technological


The Phatic Image of Cinema—Reassessed


“Consciousness Is an Epiphenomenon”


Dual Temporalities of Media and the Mind


Postcinematic Reflections on Spectatorship


2. 1900: Film Transforms the Media Landscape


Film as Prosthetic Visual Consciousness


Mechanized Culture and the Moving Image


Film and the Tyranny of Writing: Franz Kafka


3. 2000: Cinema and the Digital Image


Intermedial Constructions of Cinema’s Virtual Reality


Digital Mediations of Movement, Space, and Time


Cinema and Singular Consciousness


Conclusion


Notes


Bibliography


Index