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Book reviews collection for homepage

MinnPost | Anthology of bee poems, from Sappho to Dickinson to Bly: Proceeds to benefit U's Bee Lab
Review of IF BEES ARE FEW, edited by James Lenfestey
Governing: A Mayor's Real Job
Running a city is mostly about building community -- and that's never easy. Review of R.T. Rybak's POTHOLE CONFIDENTIAL.
Raiot: Muslim Racialization and US Law Enforcement Agencies
Excerpt of Sangay Mishra's DESIS DIVIDED.
Chicago Tribune: Animal books that showcase love, ethical questions
Mention of IF BEES ARE FEW, edited by James Lenfestey.
Pacific Standard: Why Are Self-Identified Straight Men Hooking Up With Each Other?
Recent scholarship (Riley Snorton's Nobody Is Supposed to Know) illuminates a demimonde of fluid sexuality among alpha men — and its unforgiving racial double standards.
Film International: The Mind as Camera
Review of Werner Herzog's OF WALKING IN ICE.
ITV Gold: Indian Americans' shift in voting
Interview with Sangay Mishra, author of Desis Divided.
Utne | My Father: Prisoner of War
Author Catherine Madison recounts the story of how her father was thrust into the Korean conflict and how he became a prisoner of war.
New York Times: The Blues? Overcoming Hard Times Through Swinging Elegance
The first sentence uttered by Albert Murray in “Murray Talks Music,” an insightful new book published by the University of Minnesota Press, is a concise distillation of his views on the blues. “Well, the objective of the blues musician is to get rid of the blues . . . and of course you stomp the blues not with utmost violence but with elegance.”
New York Times Book Review: Listening and Playing
“Murray Talks Music,” another of several new books about jazz, brings together some of the writer Albert Murray’s interviews and essays about music. In Apprise magazine in 1990, he talked about improvisation as a form of resilience, an ability to change and deal with new circumstances that was indicative of the American character. “If you’ve got it all nailed down, and you know where all the notes go, and you do all that, and all you have to do is have the director come up and tell you, ‘Do that,’ you’re not dealing with American experience, you see.”
Good Magazine: How To Fix All That Food Waste
Featuring FREEGANS by Alex V. Barnard.
Author Julia Lee on The Treatment
Author Julia Lee joins Elvis Mitchell to discuss how an American children's television show from the 1920's attempted to transcend racism in her book Our Gang: A Racial History of "The Little Rascals."
Star Tribune: R.T. Rybak says he's here to stay, in a city he loves like a middle-schooler's crush
As R.T. Rybak looks to his new job leading the Minneapolis Foundation, he talks about his book, his roots and why he'll stay here forever.
The Nation: A Blues for Albert Murray
His name was never household familiar. Yet his complex, mind-opening analysis of art and life remains as timely as ever—probably more so.
More Reason to Write: The Search for the Homestead Treasure
Back in the day before my kids grew up and I was a homeschooling mom looking for great books to introduce to my kids, Ann's novel The Search for the Homestead Treasure would have fit the bill perfectly.
The New Food Economy | Freeganism: food waste's first wave
Dumpster divers spurred interest in food waste a decade ago. Their message went mainstream, but what’s been lost in translation? Featuring FREEGANS by Alex V. Barnard.
Fjords: Diaboliques
Diabloques is powerfully erotic and disturbingly violent almost purely because of d’Aurevilly’s formal approach.
Futurity: This brutal online game could redefine 'fun'
On EVE Online, featuring Marcus Carter.
Lambda Literary on So Much to Be Done
Review of the book of essays by Barbara Brenner.
Fox9: 'Let's Go Fishing!' tells tales from the north woods
Segment with author Eric Dregni.