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Book reviews collection for homepage

Shepherd Express: Jim Walsh is a true believer.
“I believe everyone should stop saying ‘That rocks’ about things that absolutely do not rock.”
Booklist: Written by avid canoeists
This richly illustrated history will entrance any—and they are many—who have taken a paddle in hand.
Northern Lights Reading Project: No Recipe Needed
Excerpt + review of HOMEMADE by Beatrice Ojakangas.
The Norwegian American: New edition, old tales
The classic folktales in this reprint pull the reader into an imaginary world where good behavior guarantees rewards and magical characters appear when the hero and heroine are at their wit’s end.
WTIP with Michael Schumacher
The author of TORN IN TWO talks shipwreck with WTIP.
KFAI Radio: Jim Walsh's Mixtape Memoir
Jim Walsh started writing about the Twin Cities music scene some 30 years ago. He fell into his profession as a music journalist, compelled by an insatiable desire to take the electrical and emotional impulses of music and translate them to the page.
LARB | No mind to lose: On brainwashing
SCOTT SELISKER begins his book Human Programming: Brainwashing, Automatons, and American Unfreedom with the case of John Walker Lindh, the so-called “American Taliban” who was captured in Afghanistan as an enemy combatant shortly after the US invasion in 2001.
An honest look at POW experience
On Catherine Madison's THE WAR CAME HOME WITH HIM.
Harvard Business Review: What So Many People Don’t Get About the U.S. Working Class
References Jennifer Sherman's THOSE WHO WORK, THOSE WHO DON'T.
Shepherd Express: The Wreck of the ‘Daniel J. Morrell’
Michael Schumacher’s latest Great Lakes history adventure
NBn: Foucault in Iran
How did the preeminent theorist and philosopher Michel Foucault experience and observe the Iranian revolution? How did he find the revolution disruptive of a teleological notion of history? And how did the Iranian revolution impact and shape Foucault’s thought?
Beyond data collection — the social and political effects of environmental sensor proliferation
Jennifer Gabrys spoke with Mongabay about emerging technical applications, their deployments in the field and cultural implications of an ever more “wired up” planet.
Rising Up with Sonali: Brown Threat
The idea of brown and black bodies as threatening is as old as the US itself. In a new book author Kumarini Silva tackles the question of how racial, ethnic, and religious identity has become much more complicated in the post September 11th world.
MinnPost: A modest memoir about Beatrice Ojakangas’ amazing life in food
In her first book that isn’t a cookbook — she has written 29 cookbooks, a feat that landed her in the James Beard Hall of Fame — Ojakangas tells some stories from her own life. From growing up the first of 10 children in a family of Finns in Northern Minnesota to becoming an influential writer and thinking on cooking and food culture, Ojakangas has collected some amazing stories. She wouldn’t put it that way, though.
BGSU News: Kinney book looks at Detroit through lens of popular culture
Detroit, once a mecca for those looking for a good job and a better life, is now seen by some as what Dr. Rebecca J. Kinney calls a “beautiful wasteland.” A wasteland because of the perception of its postindustrial devastation, and beautiful because of its potential to rise like a phoenix from its ashes to reclaim its place among the country’s great cities. But who will this gleaming new city be for?
NewsClick: Busting the Technology Hyperbole of Bitcoin
All concerned citizens should read this book, which is an essential resource for understanding the true stakes of current technological hyperbole.
ReaderKidz: One North Star
An engaging, beautiful book to learn from and enjoy.
City Pages: Author Zeke Caligiuri reflects on redemption, family, and writing from prison
There’s no graceful way to say it: Zeke Caligiuri, author of the new memoir This Is Where I Am, is in prison. But the story of how he became an inmate is told in a poetic narrative anchored in the Powderhorn neighborhood where Caligiuri grew up. From falling in with the wrong crowd to selling crack, the book retraces the trajectory that resulted in Caligiuri’s imprisonment. The book is not without its bittersweet moments, including interactions with his beloved grandmother.
Star Tribune: Duluth cookbook queen Beatrice Ojakangas whips up 'Homemade' memoir
In a new memoir, Duluth cookbook author Beatrice Ojakangas tells how recipes – and the skills behind them – led to her career in food.
Tangled Up in Food: Homemade
In addition to stories, Homemade includes over 40 recipes spanning a lifetime, from the Finnish rye bread that won the teenage Ojakangas a trip to the state fair to the sponge cake she demonstrated on Martha Stewart's television show.