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The Growth of the Surface Area of the Human Body

Author:

Edith Boyd
Foreword by Richard E. Scammon

The Growth of the Surface Area of the Human Body

The Growth of the Surface Area of the Human Body was first published in 1935.

Dr. Boyd has reviewed in her monograph all the literature on the measurement and estimation of the surface area of the human body and has tabulated the data on 1,114 subjects. Most of her calculations are based on 231 subjects for whom the data were reasonably complete. She has analyzed statistically the various methods of measurement and 36 formulae for the estimation of body surface.

The surface area of the body of human subjects and experimental animals has assumed greater prominence during the last two decades and at present is employed by many physiologists as a basis of reference for estimating basal metabolism, vital capacity, cardiac output, etc. Dr. Boyd is particularly interested in the anatomical relationship to growth and has included in her studies the prenatal as well as the postnatal period.

This small monograph is carefully written, and it contains many valuable tables and figures. It will doubtless remain the standard work of reference for many years.

Journal of the American Statistical Association, 1936

The Growth of the Surface Area of the Human Body

Edith Boyd was an assistant professor in the department of anatomy and the Institute of Child Welfare at the University of Minnesota.

The Growth of the Surface Area of the Human Body

The Growth of the Surface Area of the Human Body was first published in 1935.

Dr. Boyd has reviewed in her monograph all the literature on the measurement and estimation of the surface area of the human body and has tabulated the data on 1,114 subjects. Most of her calculations are based on 231 subjects for whom the data were reasonably complete. She has analyzed statistically the various methods of measurement and 36 formulae for the estimation of body surface.

The surface area of the body of human subjects and experimental animals has assumed greater prominence during the last two decades and at present is employed by many physiologists as a basis of reference for estimating basal metabolism, vital capacity, cardiac output, etc. Dr. Boyd is particularly interested in the anatomical relationship to growth and has included in her studies the prenatal as well as the postnatal period.

This small monograph is carefully written, and it contains many valuable tables and figures. It will doubtless remain the standard work of reference for many years.

Journal of the American Statistical Association, 1936