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The British Way to Recovery

Plans and Policies in Great Britain, Australia, and Canada

Author:

Herbert Heaton

The British Way to Recovery

Professor Heaton has singular – probably unique – qualifications for the task he has undertaken, inasmuch as he has lived and taught in universities in Great Britain, Australia, Canada, and the United States . . . One of the best studies of the recent depression.

London Economist

The British Way to Recovery was first published in 1934. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions.

An answer to President Roosevelt’s question – “Did England let nature take its course?”

This book is rich in parallels between problems faced very early in the British nations and those that arose somewhat later in the United States. Six of the eight chapters deal with England, her search for solutions, and the outcome of her experiments, providing an illuminating background for similar American policies. A chapter apiece is given to Australia, “first in and first out” of the depression, and to Canada, whose geographical and political nearness makes her recovery program of particular interest to the United States.

Professor Heaton enjoys the distinction of having lived and worked in each of the countries of which he writes. He was born a Yorkshireman, was educated at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham, and taught economics at Birmingham. In Australia he lectured on economics and history at the Universities of Tasmania and Adelaide. Then he went to Queen’s University, Canada, from which he came to the University of Minnesota.

The British Way to Recovery

Herbert Heaton was professor of economic history at the University of Minnesota. His previous books include Modern Economic History and a History of Trade and Commerce.

The British Way to Recovery

Professor Heaton has singular – probably unique – qualifications for the task he has undertaken, inasmuch as he has lived and taught in universities in Great Britain, Australia, Canada, and the United States . . . One of the best studies of the recent depression.

London Economist

One of the few volumes which have come from the press this winter that no student of public affairs can afford to be without.

Today

Professor Heaton gives an excellent review of the efforts made by the British government in the fields of national finance, currency and credit policies, foreign trade, and other measures of aid and reform.

New York Times Book Review