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The Biology of Human Starvation II

Volume II

Authors:

Ancel Keys, Josef Brozek, Austin Henschel, Olaf Mickelsen, and Henry Longstreet Taylor
Foreword by J.C. Drummond, Russell M. Wilder, Charles Glen King, and Robert R. Williams

The Biology of Human Starvation II

It is reasonable to suppose that this monograph will always be considered for a landmark, and will serve for many years as a vade mecum for physicians and others.

Dr. Russell M. Wilder, Mayo Clinic

The Biology of Human Starvation was first published in 1950. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions.

With great areas of the world battling the persistent and basic problem of hunger, this work constitutes a major contribution to needed scientific knowledge. The publication is a definitive treatise on the morphology, biochemistry, physcology, psychology, and medical aspects of calorie undernutrition, cachexia, starvation, and rehabilitation in man.

Presented critically and systematically are the fact and theory from the world literature, including the evidence from World War II and the finding of the Minnesota Starvation Experiment (1944*1946). Pertinent experiments and field and clinical observations to 1949 are covered.

The extensive original research involved was conducted at the University of Minnesota Laboratory of Physiological Hygiene, which Dr. Keys heads. The authors, all of the laboratory staff, were assisted in preparation of the work by Ernst Simonson, Samuel Wells and Angie Sturgeon Skinner.

The Biology of Human Starvation II

Dr. Ancel Keys was head of the University of Minnesota Laboratory of Physiological Hygiene, while Josef Brozek, Austin Henschel, Olaf Mickelson, and Henry Longstreet Taylor were all laboratory staff in the same department.

Dr. Ancel Keys was head of the University of Minnesota Laboratory of Physiological Hygiene, while Josef Brozek, Austin Henschel, Olaf Mickelson, and Henry Longstreet Taylor were all laboratory staff in the same department.

The Biology of Human Starvation II

It is reasonable to suppose that this monograph will always be considered for a landmark, and will serve for many years as a vade mecum for physicians and others.

Dr. Russell M. Wilder, Mayo Clinic