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Scientific Pluralism

2006

Stephen H. Kellert, Helen E. Longino, and C. Kenneth Waters, editors

Scientific Pluralism

The defining work about a hotly contested scientific topic

Scientific Pluralism demonstrates the viability of the view that some phenomena require multiple accounts. Pluralists observe that scientists present various—sometimes even incompatible—models of the world and argue that this is due to the complexity of the world and representational limitations.

Contributors: John Bell, Michael Dickson, Carla Fehr, Ronald N. Giere, Geoffrey Hellman, Alan W. Richardson, C. Wade Savage, Esther-Mirjam Sent.

Scientific Pluralism will be required reading for those interested in pluralism as applied to the study of science. The collection of essays acutely illustrates the difficulties that surround attempts to provide empirically based accounts of pluralism about science.

The Pluralist

Scientific pluralism is an issue at the forefront of philosophy of science. This landmark work addresses the question, Can pluralism be advanced as a general, philosophical interpretation of science?

Scientific Pluralism demonstrates the viability of the view that some phenomena require multiple accounts. Pluralists observe that scientists present various—sometimes even incompatible—models of the world and argue that this is due to the complexity of the world and representational limitations. Including investigations in biology, physics, economics, psychology, and mathematics, this work provides an empirical basis for a consistent stance on pluralism and makes the case that it should change the ways that philosophers, historians, and social scientists analyze scientific knowledge.

Contributors: John Bell, U of Western Ontario; Michael Dickson, U of South Carolina; Carla Fehr, Iowa State U; Ronald N. Giere, U of Minnesota; Geoffrey Hellman, U of Minnesota; Alan W. Richardson, U of British Columbia; C. Wade Savage, U of Minnesota; Esther-Mirjam Sent, U of Nijmegen.

Scientific Pluralism

Stephen H. Kellert is professor of philosophy at Hamline University and a fellow of the Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science.

Helen E. Longino is professor of philosophy at Stanford University.

C. Kenneth Waters is associate professor of philosophy and director of the Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science.

Scientific Pluralism

Scientific Pluralism will be required reading for those interested in pluralism as applied to the study of science. The collection of essays acutely illustrates the difficulties that surround attempts to provide empirically based accounts of pluralism about science.

The Pluralist

In essence, Scientific Pluralism makes a well-rounded case for a pluralist philosophical approach, with the authors adeptly explaining how this stance integrates with concerns about metaphysics and metascience. I would recommend this book. It is a clear, comprehensive and informative contribution to studies in the history and philosophy of science.

Leonardo Reviews

Scientific Pluralism

Contents

Introduction: The Pluralist Stance Stephen H. Kellert, Helen E. Longino, and C. Kenneth Waters

1. The Many Unities of Science: Politics, Semantics, and Ontology Alan W. Richardson
2. Perspectival Pluralism Ronald N. Giere
3. Plurality and Complementarity in Quantum Dynamics Michael Dickson
4. Pluralism and the Foundations of Mathematics Geoffrey Hellman and John L. Bell
5. Pluralisms in Economics Esther-Mirjam Sent
6. Theoretical Pluralism and the Scientifi c Study of Behavior Helen E. Longino
7. A New/Old (Pluralist) Resolution of the Mind-Body Problem C. Wade Savage
8. Explanations of the Evolution of Sex: A Plurality of Local Mechanisms Carla Fehr
9. A Pluralist Interpretation of Gene-Centered Biology C. Kenneth Waters
10. Disciplinary Pluralism for Science Studies Stephen H. Kellert

Acknowledgments
Contributors

Index