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Our Family Has Cancer Too

2002
Author:

Christine Clifford
Illustrations by Jack Lindstrom

Our Family Has Cancer Too

Clifford and her young son demystify the ‘C word’ by telling kids how patients feel when they have cancer and are undergoing treatment, how to cope with day-to-day changes and feelings of fear and grief, and how to show love and support for the person who has the disease.

Mary Ann Grossman, St. Paul Pioneer Press

Complete with a glossary, Our Family Has Cancer, Too! offers an opportunity for you and your family to share feelings with each other about cancer and to learn the answers to the questions most kids have: What is cancer? What changes will happen to our family? What are the treatments like? How long will it take to get through the cancer experience? What do I tell my friends?

But most importantly, Our Family Has Cancer, Too! teaches you how to laugh together!

Christine Clifford, author of Not Now . . . I’m Having a No Hair Day, the first book to offer hope and humor to cancer patients, has broken new ground once again with Our Family Has Cancer, Too! With the help and insight of her son, Tim, Christine has explored the issues facing families when cancer becomes a part of life.

Our Family Has Cancer Too

A pioneer in using humor to cope with cancer, Christine Clifford is president and chief executive officer of The Cancer Club, a Minneapolis-based organization that specializes in marketing humorous and helpful products to people with cancer. A cancer survivor herself, and a dynamic public speaker, she currently brings laughter and hope to audiences nationwide with her keynote presentations and seminars about the importance of using humor to cope with chronic disease. Christine is a member of the National Speakers Association.

Our Family Has Cancer Too

Clifford and her young son demystify the ‘C word’ by telling kids how patients feel when they have cancer and are undergoing treatment, how to cope with day-to-day changes and feelings of fear and grief, and how to show love and support for the person who has the disease.

Mary Ann Grossman, St. Paul Pioneer Press