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Networking the World, 1794-2000

1900
Author:

Armand Mattelart
Translated by James A. Cohen and Liz Carey-Libbrecht

Networking the World, 1794-2000

A surprising history of global networks and their contemporary implications.

In this surprising history of communication networks, Armand Mattelart demonstrates that globalization and its attendant hype have existed since road and rail were the fastest way to move information, eloquently arguing that discourses of better living through globalization often mask projects of political, economic, and cultural domination.

Translated from French and published in the United States last year, Mattelart's book challenges the prevalent, cloying hype about Internet globalism. The Paris-based scholar is on target.

Norman Solomon, Liberal Opinion Week

In the age of satellites and the Internet, worldwide communication has become increasingly unified amid overblown claims about the redemptive possibilities of international networks. But this rhetoric is hardly new. As Armand Mattelart demonstrates in Networking the World, 1794-2000, globalization and its attendant hype have existed since road and rail were the fastest way to move information.

Mattelart places contemporary global communication networks into historical context and shows that the networking of the world began much earlier than many assume, in the late eighteenth century. He argues that the internationalization of communication was spawned by such Enlightenment ideals as universalism and liberalism, and examines how the development of global communications has been inextricably linked to the industrial revolution, modern warfare, and the emergence of nationalism. Throughout, Mattelart eloquently argues that discourses of better living through globalization often mask projects of political, economic, and cultural domination.

Networking the World, 1794-2000

Armand Mattelart is professor of information and communication sciences at the Université de Paris-VIII, Saint-Denis. He has authored nearly thirty books, including The Invention of Communication (1996), Mapping World Communication (1994), and Rethinking Media Theory (1992), all published by Minnesota.

Liz Carey-Libbrecht is a freelance translator living in France. James A. Cohen is professor of political science at the Université de Paris-VIII, Saint-Denis and at the Institut d’Etudes Politiques de Paris.

Networking the World, 1794-2000

Translated from French and published in the United States last year, Mattelart's book challenges the prevalent, cloying hype about Internet globalism. The Paris-based scholar is on target.

Norman Solomon, Liberal Opinion Week

A highly engaging volume that will be useful to students and advanced researchers alike.

Journal of Communication