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Mortality Trends in the State of Minnesota

Author:

Calvin F. Schmid

Mortality Trends in the State of Minnesota

Mortality Trends in the State of Minnesota was first published in 1937.

In this volume, Calvin F. Schmid reviews the more important statistical data regarding mortality in the state of Minnesota for the past quarter century (1910-35). Individuals who are wither engaged or actively concerned with public health will be interested in the contents. Public health workers, in Minnesota especially, will find the monograph of value in their daily activities and current procedures.

Journal of the American Statistical Association, 1938

Mortality Trends in the State of Minnesota

Calvin F. Schmid was an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Minnesota.

Mortality Trends in the State of Minnesota

Mortality Trends in the State of Minnesota was first published in 1937.

In this volume, Calvin F. Schmid reviews the more important statistical data regarding mortality in the state of Minnesota for the past quarter century (1910-35). Individuals who are wither engaged or actively concerned with public health will be interested in the contents. Public health workers, in Minnesota especially, will find the monograph of value in their daily activities and current procedures.

Journal of the American Statistical Association, 1938

This monograph contains, in compact form, basic information on mortality in the state of Minnesota for the period 1910 to 1935, inclusive. The nine chapters include separate discussions of total mortality, principal causes of death, mortality by age and sex, infant and maternal mortality, seasonal variation, comparison with the Registration Area of the United States, and mortality trends in Minneapolis and St. Paul. The Appendix presents population trends in Minnesota, a discussion of meteorological conditions in the State, and a methodological note on the allocation of births and infant deaths according to residence in Minneapolis.

The factual material is concisely stated, the numerous charts and maps present the data in a readily understandable form, and the analysis of facts is impressive. This volume will be of great value to vital statisticians and to public health officials interested in Minnesota, since it contains the basic data frequently needed by both groups.

Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 1938