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Mental Hygiene for Community Nursing

Author:

Eric K. Clarke

Mental Hygiene for Community Nursing

“In twelve chapters, Dr. Clarke beautifully develops the thesis that each one’s reaction to illness (and many times the illness itself) is but a natural part of his total life pattern, and that the community nurse is in the strategic position to give real help. The book is full of short case histories which commend themselves particularly as being “run of the mill” patients whom the nurse sees from day to day. The reviewer cannot remember another psychiatric product that is so nicely tuned to the group for whom it is written.

Some of the terms are pretty complicated for the amateur - but could not have been more adequately described without unjust lengthening of the text. Everyone who reads this book must develop an interest in the why of the crankiness, the unreasonableness, the faith or hope of her patients. And that is at least half of the trick.

The book covers habit problems and many of the usual ones of the school child; it goes over the more common family conflicts; there is an excellent chapter on convalescents; the adolescent and the handicapped child each has a good chapter. the psychoneurotic is as hard to deal with in the book as in life - but Dr. Clarke sets up a clear picture of our limitations here. The chapter on what the community nurse can do for the psychotic and his family, is peculiarly good.

All in all, an excellent tilling of a new field by a man who knows his business.” - James S. Plant,American Journal of Public Health (June 1942)

James S. Plant - American Journal of Public Health (June, 1942)

Mental Hygiene for Community Nursing

Eric Kent Clarke was a Director of the Psychiatric Clinic for Children, as well as a Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota Medical School.

Mental Hygiene for Community Nursing

“In twelve chapters, Dr. Clarke beautifully develops the thesis that each one’s reaction to illness (and many times the illness itself) is but a natural part of his total life pattern, and that the community nurse is in the strategic position to give real help. The book is full of short case histories which commend themselves particularly as being “run of the mill” patients whom the nurse sees from day to day. The reviewer cannot remember another psychiatric product that is so nicely tuned to the group for whom it is written.

Some of the terms are pretty complicated for the amateur - but could not have been more adequately described without unjust lengthening of the text. Everyone who reads this book must develop an interest in the why of the crankiness, the unreasonableness, the faith or hope of her patients. And that is at least half of the trick.

The book covers habit problems and many of the usual ones of the school child; it goes over the more common family conflicts; there is an excellent chapter on convalescents; the adolescent and the handicapped child each has a good chapter. the psychoneurotic is as hard to deal with in the book as in life - but Dr. Clarke sets up a clear picture of our limitations here. The chapter on what the community nurse can do for the psychotic and his family, is peculiarly good.

All in all, an excellent tilling of a new field by a man who knows his business.” - James S. Plant,American Journal of Public Health (June 1942)

James S. Plant - American Journal of Public Health (June, 1942)