Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

Navigation

Local Government and Finance in Minnesota

Author:

William Anderson

Local Government and Finance in Minnesota

This is more than a monograph on local government in Minnesota. It represents the fruition of years of labor and of thought in the field of American local government by one of its best interpreters. Minnesota furnishes the rich mine in which Professor Anderson digs for significant data. The broad scope of the study is indicated by the three primary parts into which his treatment of local government is divided: (1) structure, (2) finance, (3) functions. Throughout, a nice balance has been maintained between data, generalizations, and principles of readjustment. The emphasis in the book is not that of an advocate, but of a scholarly and practical leader.

American Political Science Review

Local Government and Finance in Minnesota was first published in 1935. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions.

A comprehensive survey, by the foremost authority in the state, of the organization, history, functions, and administrative procedures of local government units in Minnesota.

Local Government and Finance in Minnesota

William Anderson was a professor of political science at the University of Minnesota. He is the author of Man’s Quest for Political Knowledge (1942) and The Nation and the States, Rivals or Partners? (1955), both published by the University of Minnesota Press.

Local Government and Finance in Minnesota

This is more than a monograph on local government in Minnesota. It represents the fruition of years of labor and of thought in the field of American local government by one of its best interpreters. Minnesota furnishes the rich mine in which Professor Anderson digs for significant data. The broad scope of the study is indicated by the three primary parts into which his treatment of local government is divided: (1) structure, (2) finance, (3) functions. Throughout, a nice balance has been maintained between data, generalizations, and principles of readjustment. The emphasis in the book is not that of an advocate, but of a scholarly and practical leader.

American Political Science Review