Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

Navigation

Intergovernmental Relations and the Courts

Author:

Forrest Talbott

Intergovernmental Relations and the Courts

Intergovernmental Relations and the Courts was first published in 1950.

The University of Minnesota has instituted the present series, with a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation, to demonstrate the possibilities of research concerning contemporary intergovernmental relations and to reveal its intricacies and difficulties. Other studies will deal with highways, education, public finance, social welfare, and other subjects. The principal author, whose fields are history and political science, spent half time on the project for two years. The sections on historical development of court systems, constitutional doctrine, and the dual court system are concise and readable. There are many excellent charts and statistical tables dealing with personnel, caseload, and interagency practices of state courts, particularly probate and justice courts.

The American Journal of Comparative Law, 1953

Intergovernmental Relations and the Courts

Tags

Intergovernmental Relations and the Courts

Forrest Talbott was a professor of political science at Mankato State Teachers College.

Intergovernmental Relations and the Courts

Intergovernmental Relations and the Courts was first published in 1950.

The University of Minnesota has instituted the present series, with a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation, to demonstrate the possibilities of research concerning contemporary intergovernmental relations and to reveal its intricacies and difficulties. Other studies will deal with highways, education, public finance, social welfare, and other subjects. The principal author, whose fields are history and political science, spent half time on the project for two years. The sections on historical development of court systems, constitutional doctrine, and the dual court system are concise and readable. There are many excellent charts and statistical tables dealing with personnel, caseload, and interagency practices of state courts, particularly probate and justice courts.

The American Journal of Comparative Law, 1953