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Female Gangs in America

Essays on Girls, Gangs and Gender

John M. Hagedorn and Meda Chesney-Lind, editors

Female Gangs in America

The essential work on female gangs, by leading theorists and researchers from Frederic Thrasher to the present day.

"Chesney-Lind and Hagedorn provide us with a much needed view into the lives of girls in gangs. All too often either ignored, seen as appendages of boys and their gangs, and demonized by the media, girl gangs are one of the most under-studied, misunderstood, and "unheard" populations. This book provides us with a richness of description and an abundance of varied analyses about the lives of girls and young women from marginalized communities--too often poor communities of color. It does so through along needed treatment that is sensitive to the life experiences and broader social, economic, racial, and political contexts within which girls in gangs operate--for better and for worse. For anyone concerned about young people in our society--both young women and young men--this book is a 'must.'"

Natalie Sokoloff, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY

Female Gangs in America

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Female Gangs in America

John M. Hagedorn is the author of People and Folks: Gangs, Crime and the Underclass in a Rustbelt City, and Forsaking Our Children: Bureaucracy and Reform in the Child Welfare System. He has studied gangs in Milwaukee for 15 years, most recently as principal investigator of in the Posse and Homegirl Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee's Urban Research Center. He is now investigating the business of drugs and the underground economy. He is Associate Professor in the Criminal Justice Department of the University of Illinois-Chicago.

Meda Chesney-Lind is Professor of Women's Studies at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Her books include Girls, Delinquency and Juvenile Justice, which was awarded the American Society of Criminology's Michael J. Hindelang Award for the "outstanding contribution to criminology," and The Female Offender: Girls, Women and Crime. A fellow and former Vice President of the American Society of Criminology, among her many awards are the American Society of Criminology's Herbert Block Award for service to the society and the profession and the Donald Cressey Award from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency.

Female Gangs in America

"Chesney-Lind and Hagedorn provide us with a much needed view into the lives of girls in gangs. All too often either ignored, seen as appendages of boys and their gangs, and demonized by the media, girl gangs are one of the most under-studied, misunderstood, and "unheard" populations. This book provides us with a richness of description and an abundance of varied analyses about the lives of girls and young women from marginalized communities--too often poor communities of color. It does so through along needed treatment that is sensitive to the life experiences and broader social, economic, racial, and political contexts within which girls in gangs operate--for better and for worse. For anyone concerned about young people in our society--both young women and young men--this book is a 'must.'"

Natalie Sokoloff, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY

"For decades, gang researchers have ignored and trivialized female gangs, but for the girls who join them, the experience is anything but trivial. This book goes a long way towards rectifying that neglect. By assembling the wide range of perceptions and analyses of female gangs, the editors make glaringly obvious the huge gaps in our knowledge. This book should provide a major stimulus for general readers as well as researchers to take another, and better-informed look at this serious social problem."

Joan Moore, Former President of the Society for the Study of Social Problems and author of Homeboys: Gangs, Drugs and Prison in the Barrios of Los Angeles

"A long overdue collection of scholarship on female gangs and female gang members, this volume challenges many of the myths and stereotypes that have characterized much of the literature and allows the reader to meet the subjects "up close and personal." Must reading for everyone seeking to have an informed and balanced perspective on the "other" gangs in America and what can be done to help these young women meet their needs."

C. Ronald Huff, Dean, School of Social Ecology, University of California-Irvine