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Else/Where

New Cartographies of Networks and Territories

2005

Janet Abrams and Peter Hall, editors

Else/Where

The new role of maps in the information age

Else/Where: Mapping proposes—by visual example and written analysis—that mapmaking is a fundamental design process, one that shapes the dimensions of contemporary multicultural society. It is the second installment in an international collaboration focusing on the design implications of new technologies.

As a designer, I felt inspired by the book to look more deeply into the connectivity of everything around me and around the spaces I design. I started the book feeling overwhelmed by the plethora of mapping examples, but finished it with only the desire for more.

Kristen Fritsch, American Institute of Architects

Else/Where: Mapping explores the importance of maps as aids to navigation, understanding, and cultural representation. Traditionally written by history’s victors, maps are gaining new currency in our information-saturated age as a means of making arguments and processes visible. Mapping technologies today are as diverse as the agendas driving them: the human body is mapped with 3-D software, buildings are mapped with lasers, and cities are mapped by satellite. Else/Where proposes—by visual example and written analysis—that mapmaking is a fundamental design process, one that shapes the physical and conceptual dimensions of contemporary multicultural society.

Else/Where: Mapping is the second installment in an international visual/verbal collaboration focusing on the design implications of new technologies.

Distributed for the University of Minnesota Design Institute

Awards

I.D. Magazine Design Distinction in Graphics Award

Else/Where

Janet Abrams is director of the University of Minnesota Design Institute. She edited IF/THEN while working at the Netherlands Design Institute, Amsterdam.

Peter Hall is senior editor at the University of Minnesota Design Institute and a contributing writer to Metropolis magazine.

Else/Where

As a designer, I felt inspired by the book to look more deeply into the connectivity of everything around me and around the spaces I design. I started the book feeling overwhelmed by the plethora of mapping examples, but finished it with only the desire for more.

Kristen Fritsch, American Institute of Architects

An informative and enthusiastic contribution!

Book Reviews

Else/Where: Mapping contains a fascinating collection of new kinds of maps of new realities.

Eye Magazine

Lavishly illustrated and designed, coherent and practical.

SciTech Book News

A varied and eclectic picture of recent developments in information representation. This book allows the reader to dip in and chart his or her own course. It’s a fascinating document that updates our understanding of the new ways in which many people are plotting our world.

Azure

You can get a little lost diving into Else/Where: Mapping, a thoughtful, far-ranging look at how mapping techniques are being used to visualize a lot more than landforms and cityscapes.

St. Paul Pioneer Press

Calling all aficionados of ‘locative media practice’—the editors and contributors of Else/Where have assembled dozens of noteworthy new media-mapping projects into one sprawling tome. With offerings as diverse as examinations of the globalization of football to the swimming patterns of pigeons, an infectious enthusiasm guides the way.

Metropolis

Every piece here has something to say. The book is smartly laid out, with pages big enough to accommodate inset images and various column formats, and small enough to read comfortably. The design—bursting with flaps and interstices—conveys the promise of this re-energized discipline. Else/Where, quite literally, takes on the world. It shouldn’t be read only by information design specialists. As anyone who’s ever turned a two-hour drive into an all day road trip can attest, we should all care about maps.

Rain Taxi Review of Books

Else/Where points towards current and future possibilities across an array of networks, formats, methodologies and technologies, suggesting some of the exciting steps being taken to explore where such potential might lead.

Material Culture