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British Broadcasting in Transition

Author:

Burton Paulu

British Broadcasting in Transition
British Broadcasting in Transition

Burton Paulu, an American, was a professor and director of the department of radio and television broadcasting at the University of Minnesota. He spend several years in the United Kingdom and on the Continent studying broadcasting operations and was a member of the United States exchange group which observed Soviet radio and television in the
U.S.S.R. in 1958. He served as a president of the National Association of Educational Broadcasters.

British Broadcasting in Transition

Contents
I BRITISH BROADCASTING TODAY 3
Britain's Two Broadcasting Agencies, 4. The Problems of British
Broadcasting, 5.
II THE BRITISH BROADCASTING CORPORATION 7
A Historical Review, 7. The BBC as a Monopoly, 9. BBC
Finances, 10. The BBC as a Public Corporation, 14. The BBC
Staff, 17. The BBC's Physical Plant, 19. BBC Program Policies,
22. The BBC and Competition, 24.
III THE INDEPENDENT TELEVISION AUTHORITY 30
The Background for British Commercial Television, 30. The
Campaign for Commercial Television, 32. The Structure of the
ITA, 38. Program Requirements, 39. Advertising, 42. ITA
Finances, 49. ITA Staff and Facilities, 52.
IV INDEPENDENT TELEVISION'S PROGRAM
COMPANIES 57
The Program Companies Before the Law, 57. The Program
Contractors, 61. Program Company Finances, 66. Studios and
Staff, 73. Advertising Agencies in Independent Television, 75.
v TELEVISION PROGRAMS IN THE UNITED KING-
DOM : NEWS AND OPINION 77
Hours on the Air, 78. Networks in British Television, 81. Program
Balance and Emphasis, 82. BBC News and Special Events Pro-
grams, 86. ITV News, 91. Programs of Opinion and Controversy,
94.
VI TELEVISION PROGRAMS IN THE UNITED KING-
DOM : POLITICAL BROADCASTING 102
Party Political and Ministerial Broadcasts, 102. Election Broad-
casts, 105. The 1959 General Election, 110.
VII TELEVISION PROGRAMS IN THE UNITED KING-
DOM: INFORMATION, EDUCATION, AND ENTER-
TAINMENT 118
Informational Programs for Adults, 118. Programs for Schools,
120. Children's Programs, 123. Religious Programs, 126. Pro-
grams of Serious Music, 129. Dramatic Programs, 131. Light En-
tertainment and Sports, 136. Films, 139. Eurovision, 141. Region-
al Broadcasting, 143. The Commercials, 144.
VIII THE IMPACT OF TELEVISION ON RADIO, PRESS,
AND CINEMA 147
The Early Years of Radio, 147. Postwar Reorganization, 148. The
Influence of Television on Radio, 152. The New Pattern, 157.
Television and the Press, 162. Television and the Cinema, 166.
IX THE AUDIENCE FOR BRITISH RADIO AND
TELEVISION 169
Sources of Information, 169. Distribution of Radio and Tele-
vision Receivers, 173. Total Consumption of Radio and Tele-
vision, 178. Program Preferences, 183. Conclusions, 189.
x THE FUTURE OF BRITISH BROADCASTING 191
Monopoly versus Competition, 191. The Future of British Broad-
casting, 202.
APPENDIX 225
NOTES 231
BIBLIOGRAPHY 242
INDEX 246