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A Slave’s Tale

2013
Author:

Erik Christian Haugaard

A Slave’s Tale

The dynamic sequel to Hakon of Rogen’s Saga

The sequel to Hakon of Rogen’s Saga, this book is told from the point of view of a slave girl, Helga, who stows away on the longship when Hakon, the young Viking chieftain, sets sail for France on a voyage to return a freed slave to his homeland. The voyagers’ journey is perilous, and upon reaching France only tragedy ensues.

The beautiful style of writing, the understanding of what slavery and freedom mean to the human spirit, as well as a good plot, exciting and convincing, give distinction to this tale.

Library Journal, June 1965

A Slave’s Tale, the sequel to Hakon of Rogen’s Saga, is told from the point of view of a slave girl, Helga, who stows away on the longship when Hakon, the young Viking chieftain, sets sail for France on a voyage to return Rark, a freed slave, to his homeland. The voyagers’ journey is perilous—they narrowly escape capture by an invading fleet, and their ship is severely damaged by a storm. Upon reaching France—where the Vikings are now hated, not feared—only tragedy ensues.

A Slave’s Tale

Erik Christian Haugaard (1923–2009) was a celebrated Danish author and translator of more than twenty critically acclaimed books for young readers, including The Samurai’s Tale, The Boy and the Samurai, and The Revenge of the Forty-Seven Samurai. His books have been awarded the American Library Association Notable Book Award, Jane Addams Award, and the Boston Globe Horn Book Award, among others.

Leo (1933–2012) and Diane (1933–) Dillon’s award-winning illustrations have appeared in countless books for more than forty years. Their many honors include two Caldecott Medals, the New York Times Best Illustrated Children’s Book Award, the Boston Globe Horn Book Award, and the International Hans Christian Andersen Award.

A Slave’s Tale

The beautiful style of writing, the understanding of what slavery and freedom mean to the human spirit, as well as a good plot, exciting and convincing, give distinction to this tale.

Library Journal, June 1965

Much of the stark epic quality of Hakon of Rogen’s Saga is here, but rising above it is a deeply felt message. . . . An absorbing, powerful story.

Horn Book, August 1965

An outstanding tale for older readers, with strength and poetry in its telling.

Chicago Tribune

The past comes vividly alive in this vigorous and romantic saga of the Viking era.

Commonweal, May 1965