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A Modern Ukrainian Grammar

Authors:

George S. N. Luckyj and Jaroslav B. Rudnyckyj

A Modern Ukrainian Grammar

This lithoprinted grammar marks a great advance over previous elementary books in Ukrainian. For the first time there has appeared, thanks to the support of the Humanities Research Council of Canada, a Ukrainian grammar in a style comparable to grammars in other European languages. For the most part the explanations are fairly clear and satisfactory, although the student will at times be bewildered by the apparent arbitrary character of some of the rules. This, however, is to be explained by the difficulties of making certain developments which are clear to the philologist intelligible to the beginner who is interested in the language of the present and does not have a detailed knowledge of Church Slavic and the older forms of Ukrainian in which Church Slavic played a more important part...

...The great asset of the book is the fact that it does give a good description of the modern Ukrainian, something that has long been needed, with the growing number of Ukrainians who are in contact with the English-speaking world, and we can thank the authors and the sponsors for it. -Clarence A Manning, Columbia University

-JSTOR: The Modern Language Journal, Vol 34. No 1 (Jan. 1950). pp. 80

A Modern Ukrainian Grammar

George Luckyj was a Professor Emeritus of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Toronto.

Jaroslav B. Rudnyckyj was a professor and director of Slavic Studies at the University of Manitoba.

A Modern Ukrainian Grammar

This lithoprinted grammar marks a great advance over previous elementary books in Ukrainian. For the first time there has appeared, thanks to the support of the Humanities Research Council of Canada, a Ukrainian grammar in a style comparable to grammars in other European languages. For the most part the explanations are fairly clear and satisfactory, although the student will at times be bewildered by the apparent arbitrary character of some of the rules. This, however, is to be explained by the difficulties of making certain developments which are clear to the philologist intelligible to the beginner who is interested in the language of the present and does not have a detailed knowledge of Church Slavic and the older forms of Ukrainian in which Church Slavic played a more important part...

...The great asset of the book is the fact that it does give a good description of the modern Ukrainian, something that has long been needed, with the growing number of Ukrainians who are in contact with the English-speaking world, and we can thank the authors and the sponsors for it. -Clarence A Manning, Columbia University

-JSTOR: The Modern Language Journal, Vol 34. No 1 (Jan. 1950). pp. 80