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A Measure of Success

The Influence of Curriculum-Based Measurement on Education

2012

Christine Espin, Kristen McMaster, Susan Rose, and Miya Miura Wayman, Editors

A Measure of Success

The past, present, and possible future of using progress monitoring to improve educational outcomes

Gathering an international group of leading researchers and practitioners, A Measure of Success provides a comprehensive picture of the past, present, and possible future of Curriculum-Based Measurement progress monitoring. Timely and unique, this volume will interest anyone in education who wants to harness the potential advantage of progress monitoring to improve outcomes for students.

A Measure of Success provides insight into the development, history, research, and practical applications of Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM). Although many in the field of special education know about and perhaps teach or use CBM, not many of us understand the impetus for Stanley Deno’s original idea for an efficient way to measure student progress, or the level of research supporting the use of CBM. This collection provides testament to his commitment to improving skills of teachers and other school personnel so they may positively impact student outcomes.

Dr. Janie Hodge, Clemson University

Simple in concept, far-reaching in implementation, Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM) was developed in the 1980s as an efficient way to assess the progress of struggling students, including those with disabilities. Today, there are few areas of special education policy and practice that have not been influenced by CBM progress monitoring. The impact of CBM is reflected in recent education reforms that emphasize improvements in assessment and data-based decision making. Gathering an international group of leading researchers and practitioners, A Measure of Success provides a comprehensive picture of the past, present, and possible future of CBM progress monitoring. The book will be instrumental for researchers and practitioners in both general and special education, particularly those involved in the rapidly growing Response to Intervention (RTI) approach, an approach used to determine the performance and placement of students with learning difficulties.

A Measure of Success presents a nuanced examination of CBM progress monitoring in reading, math, and content-area learning to assess students at all levels, from early childhood to secondary school, and with a wide range of abilities, from high- and low-incidence disabilities to no disabilities. This study also evaluates how the approach has affected instructional practices, teacher training, psychology and school psychology, educational policy, and research in the United States and beyond.

Timely and unique, this volume will interest anyone in education who wants to harness the potential advantage of progress monitoring to improve outcomes for students.

Contributors: Laurence Bergeron; Lionel A. Blatchley; Renee Bradley; Mary T. Brownell, U of Florida; Todd W. Busch, U of St. Thomas; Heather M. Campbell, St. Olaf College; Ann Casey; Theodore J. Christ, U of Minnesota; Kelli D. Cummings, U of Oregon; Eric Dion, U du Québec à Montréal; Isabelle Dubé, U du Québec à Montréal; Hank Fien, U of Oregon; Anne Foegen, Iowa State U; Douglas Fuchs, Vanderbilt U; Lynn S. Fuchs, Vanderbilt U; Gary Germann; Kim Gibbons; Roland H. Good III, U of Oregon; Anne W. Graves, San Diego State U; John L. Hosp, U of Iowa; Michelle K. Hosp; Joseph R. Jenkins, U of Washington; Ruth A. Kaminski; Panayiota Kendeou, Neapolis U Pafos, Cyprus; Dong-il Kim, Seoul National U, South Korea; Amanda Kloo, U of Pittsburgh; Danika Landry, U du Québec à Montréal; Erica Lembke, U of Missouri; Francis E. Lentz Jr., U of Cincinnati; Sylvia Linan-Thompson, U of Texas at Austin; Charles D. Machesky; Doug Marston; James L. McLeskey, U of Florida; Timothy C. Papadopoulos, U of Cyprus; Kelly A. Powell-Smith; Greg Roberts, U of Texas at Austin; Margaret J. Robinson; Steven L. Robinson, Minnesota State U, Mankato; Catherine Roux, U du Québec à Montréal; Barbara J. Scierka; Edward S. Shapiro, Lehigh U; Jongho Shin, Seoul National U, South Korea; Mark R. Shinn, National Louis U; James G. Shriner, U of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Paul T. Sindelar, U of Florida; Deborah L. Speece, U of Maryland; Pamela M. Stecker, Clemson U; Martha L. Thurlow, U of Minnesota; Renáta Tichá, U of Minnesota; Gerald Tindal, U of Oregon; Paul van den Broek, Leiden U, the Netherlands; Sharon Vaughn, U of Texas at Austin; Dana L. Wagner, Augsburg College; Teri Wallace, Minnesota State U, Mankato; Jeanne Wanzek, Florida State U; Mary Jane White, U of Minnesota; Mitchell L. Yell, U of South Carolina; Naomi Zigmond, U of Pittsburgh.

A Measure of Success

Christine A. Espin is professor of education and child studies and special education at Leiden University, the Netherlands.

Kristen L. McMaster and Susan Rose are associate professors of educational psychology at the University of Minnesota.

Miya Miura Wayman is a consultant at the University of Minnesota.

A Measure of Success

A Measure of Success provides insight into the development, history, research, and practical applications of Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM). Although many in the field of special education know about and perhaps teach or use CBM, not many of us understand the impetus for Stanley Deno’s original idea for an efficient way to measure student progress, or the level of research supporting the use of CBM. This collection provides testament to his commitment to improving skills of teachers and other school personnel so they may positively impact student outcomes.

Dr. Janie Hodge, Clemson University

To gather so much expertise into one volume is a great way to help readers deepen their understanding of an idea that is beautiful in its simplicity, yet complex in its scope and impact.

Dr. Evelyn Johnson, Boise State University

A Measure of Success provides a great deal of information for educational leaders and teachers on CMB ... it serves as a great entryway for those who are not sure where to start researching Curriculum-Based Measurement.

Teachers College Record

A Measure of Success should be read by anyone interested in improving teaching practices and student outcomes.

Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education

A Measure of Success

Contents

Abbreviations
Introduction
Christine Espin, Kristen L. McMaster, and Susan Rose
1. Curriculum-Based Measurement: The Paradigm, History, and Legacy
Joseph R. Jenkins and Lynn S. Fuchs
Part I. Contributions to Educational Policy and Practice
2. A Review of Deno and Mirkin’s Special Education Resource Teacher (SERT) Model: An Early Effort to Reconcile the Right to Social Integration with a Need for Effective Instruction
Douglas Fuchs and Renee Bradley
3. Using Curriculum-Based Measurement to Develop Educationally Meaningful and Legally Sound Individual Education Programs (IEPs)
Mitchell L. Yell and Todd W. Busch
4. When the “Emerging Alternative” Becomes the Standard
John L. Hosp and Michelle K. Hosp
Part II: School-Based and District-Wide Applications
5. School and District-wide Implementation of Curriculum-Based Measurement in the Minneapolis Public Schools
Doug Marston
6. Implementing Data-Based Program Modification Big Ideas
Gary Germann
7. The Contribution of Curriculum-Based Measurement to Response to Intervention:
Research, Policy and School Practice
Kim Gibbons and Ann Casey
Part III. Applications in Elementary School Education
8. How Curriculum-Based Measures Help Us Detect Word Recognition
Problems in First Graders
Eric Dion, Isabelle Dubé, Catherine Roux, Danika Landry, and Laurence Bergeron
9. How Progress Monitoring Research Contributed to Early Intervention for
and Prevention of Reading Difficulty
Roland H. Good III, Ruth A. Kaminski, Hank Fien, Kelly A. Powell-Smith, and Kelli D. Cummings
10. Technological Applications of Curriculum-Based Measurement in
Elementary Settings: CBM in the Digital Age
Erica Lembke, Kristen McMaster, and Pamela M. Stecker
Part IV. Applications in Secondary School Education
11. Big Ideas and Core Values: The Influence of Stanley Deno’s Work on
Secondary Mathematics Progress Monitoring
Anne Foegen
12. They’re Getting Older . . . but Are They Getting Better? The Influence of
Curriculum-Based Measurement on Programming for Secondary-School Students with
Learning Disabilities
Christine Espin and Heather M. Campbell
Part V. Applications in General Education Settings
13. Curriculum-Based Measurement at Larue Elementary: They Said it Couldn’t be Done!
Amanda Kloo, Charles D. Machesky, and Naomi Zigmond
14. Curriculum-Based Measurement Progress Monitoring and the Health of General
Education
Deborah L. Speece
Part VI. Applications for Special School Populations
15. Curriculum-Based Measurement and English Language Learners: District-Wide Academic Norms for Special Education Eligibility
Steven L. Robinson, Margaret J. Robinson, and Lionel A. Blatchley
16. A Tribute to Stanley Deno: Curriculum-Based Measurement for English Learners in
First Grade
Anne W. Graves
17. Extending Curriculum-Based Measurement to Assess Performance of
Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities
Teri Wallace and Renáta Tichá
Part VII. Applications in State Assessments of Schools
18. How Curriculum-Based Measurement Progress Monitoring Contributes to the Alignment of Instruction and State Adopted Standards and Assessments
Greg Roberts, Jeanne Wanzek, and Sharon Vaughn
19. Curriculum-Based Measures: Application with State Assessments
Gerald Tindal
20. Curriculum-Based Measurement, Progress Monitoring, and State
Assessments
James G. Shriner and Martha L. Thurlow
Part VIII. Uses for Teacher Development
21. Stanley Deno’s Contributions to Teacher Education Scholarship and
Practice
Paul T. Sindelar, James L. McLeskey, and Mary T. Brownell
22. The Impact of Curriculum-Based Measurement on Teacher Practice
Dana L. Wagner and Barbara J. Scierka
Part IX: Uses in Psychology and School Psychology
23. Data-Based Program Modification and the Launching of Careers
Edward S. Shapiro and Francis E. Lentz, Jr.
24. School Psychology as Problem Solving
Theodore J. Christ
25. Cognitive Processes in Reading and the Measurement of Comprehension
Paul van den Broek and Mary Jane White
Part X. International Contributions
26: Current Status of Curriculum-Based Measurement in Korea
Dong-il Kim
27. Footprints of Curriculum-Based Measurement in South Korea: Past,
Present, and Future
Jongho Shin
28. Expanding the Use of Curriculum-Based Measurement: A Look at Nicaragua
Sylvia Linan-Thompson
29. The Use of Curriculum-Based Measurement Maze in Greek: A Closer Look at What it Measures
Panayiota Kendeou and Timothy C. Papadopoulos
Conclusion
Reflections on the Influence of Curriculum-Based Measurement on Educational Practice and Policy…and Its Progenitor
Mark R. Shinn
Contributors
Index